Should I store my presets with my catalog?

Last week, we discussed the options for using your catalog on more than one computer. When you open your catalog on the second computer, however, you may find that your presets are missing. These include Develop presets, Metadata presets, Import presets, Print templates and so forth.

By default, your presets are stored in your user account on your computer, but if you’re using your catalog with multiple computers, you can choose to store them with the catalog by checking the Preferences dialog > Presets tab > Store presets with this catalog checkbox.

Before you rush off to check the checkbox, there are a few warnings to note, as this checkbox causes as much confusion as it solves:

  • Lightroom doesn’t move the presets to the new location automatically, so we’ll step through how to do that in a moment.
  • If your presets ever seem to have ‘gone missing’, that checkbox is probably to blame.
  • When checked, the presets are only available to that specific catalog, so don’t check it if you need to use multiple catalogs (unless you want different presets with each catalog).
  • Some settings are always stored in the user account, regardless of the Store presets with this catalog checkbox state. These include default Develop settings, custom point curves, lens and camera profiles, and email account settings, which are always tied to a single machine.
    • (There is a way of using Symbolic Links and Dropbox to sync presets, including these defaults and profiles, which is covered on pages 515-517 of my Lightroom CC/6 book.)
  • In most situations, this checkbox causes unnecessary confusion, so I’d recommend leaving it unchecked unless you have a specific reason for using it (such as using a single catalog on multiple computers).

Checking or unchecking the Store presets with this catalog only changes where Lightroom looks for presets and stores new ones.  It doesn’t copy any existing presets to the new location, so you need to manually copy them.  To do so:

  1. Go to Preferences > Presets tab and uncheck Store presets with this catalog and press the Show Lightroom Presets Folder button.
  2. An Explorer (Windows) / Finder (Mac) window opens, showing the presets in your user account.
    • You can also navigate to this location manually. The full path is:
      Windows—C: Users [your username] AppData Roaming Adobe Lightroom Mac—Macintosh HD / Users / [your username] / Library / Application Support / Adobe / Lightroom /
  3. Keep the Explorer/Finder window open in the background and switch back to Lightroom.
  4. Check the Store presets with this catalog checkbox and press the Show Lightroom Presets Folder button again.
  5. A second Explorer (Windows) / Finder (Mac) window opens, showing the catalog-specific Lightroom Settings folder.
  6. Drag (or copy/paste) your presets from the user account folder to the catalog-specific one (or vice versa, depending on where you want the presets stored.

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Yet Another Custom Print Layout for Wedding Albums (or whatever)

It’s Wednesday, and time for another custom print layout. This is a six-photo layout with three wide photos, two small tall photos, and one large tall. Of course, I also make the template downloadable, but you should still watch the video (ya know, the whole “teach a man to fish” thing. 🙂

So, here’s how to create your own 6-photo layout:

There you have it. Hope you found that helpful.

Here’s a link to the template I created just for you guys on LRKT.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Did I mention I’m doing a Lightroom seminar in Boston on Friday and Philadelphia on Monday? Well, it’s true. I probably mentioned it, maybe in passing, but ya know, wanna make sure you didn’t miss it. 🙂

 

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It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Chip Litherland!

10 Ways to Help Find Clients Find You

The hard truth about this industry is never really advertised. The gap between hobbyists and professional photographers has never been smaller. Technology has leveled the playing field when it comes to focus, exposure, timing, and even post processing. More capable photographers means more available imagery and thus lower prices. This presents a challenge when attempting to build and grow a successful photography business. It’s no longer enough to compete solely on skill, talent, or experience. It’s about showing your viewpoint, selling your ideas, creativity, and professionalism.

After 15 years of surviving then building a business in a post-newspaper apocalypse, why would I move from Florida to Denver? Change and growth. I needed a jump start, wanted to go back to what I felt was “home,” and start seeing differently. What I didn’t know was how to find an entirely new group of clients while satisfying my old base in a way that would allow me to keep working in both states.

The solution was a new brand, LOCK + LAND. In order to succeed I needed to elevate my business beyond a dude with a camera who likes to make colorful photos. After many long hours on the phone and many beers in person, I decided to go into business with my friend and fellow photographer, Peter Lockley. This would allow me to move beyond just waiting for the phone to ring, shooting something random, cashing a check, and repeating that cycle over and over. It would give me accountability, someone to collaborate with, and more opportunity to shoot.

I’ve had the luxury of a pretty amazing core group of clients in Florida – LEGOLAND Florida Resort, ESPN, Universal Orlando, The Player’s Tribune, New College of Florida, and Florida Department of Citrus, to name a few. They, along with a steady stream of weddings, kept me busy and fit my vision. In Colorado I had none, so how do you go about that mid career and find new ones? They’re not just going to start calling once I hit the Colorado border.

Peter and I took a very deliberate approach to growing LOCK + LAND. Here’s 10 ways we are approaching growing our business and finding new clients:

1. SOCIAL
Social media is the easiest way to get your work out there, but it’s also a challenge to reach the right people. Apps like Instagram and Facebook regulate the number of people who see each post and they charge if you want to “boost” it to a larger audience. We don’t pay to boost our content, but depending on your target audience, those channels could be very helpful. We treat it as a tool for keeping our clients informed of what we’re doing if they do pin, but it is a small piece of what we do to attract clientele.

2. EXCEL AT CUSTOMER SERVICE
This is a lost art. One of our big focuses is keeping our clients happy in Florida, to keep them using us as we grow. Most of them stuck with us during the transition, so we fly back there a lot and go out of our way to make sure they are happy. Superior customer service, having fun, and adding value to what we do with either digital library management or new services is a priority. Good customer service can lead to new opportunities. When someone in the position to hire you leaves one company, there’s a good chance they’ll end up in a position to hire you in their new job, and your client tree grows.

3. FOCUS ON BEING A GOOD PEER
Make friends in the industry. I would have never landed the LEGOLAND Florida Resort account without the recommendation of a friend for a simple press conference years ago. We also might have lost that account if not for a heads up to a change in marketing personnel from another colleague. Work is often thrown back and forth between photographers. Most importantly, do a great job if someone sends work your way. A personal recommendation is often more powerful than a great portfolio, so try to network as much as possible. We give back, we speak at colleges, we participate in photo gatherings, and we try to meet as many people as we can.

4. RESEARCH + TARGET MARKET
It’s easy to subscribe to a service that emails thousands of art buyers on your behalf. It’s a shotgun approach, and you hope that something sticks, but it rarely does. It’s not to say that you shouldn’t mass market, just be aware that there are limitations and a ton of competition in that space. We’ve talked to art directors who get hundreds of postcards every week. What we’ve done now is a create a local dream client list of 20 ad agencies and companies here in CO and find out who the actual person is that can hire and do a slow introduction to our work and familiarize themselves with our brand while at the same time learning theirs. We want to put all our marketing efforts and money into finding not a bunch of clients, but a few of the right ones. Clients who fit our vision, are fun to work for, and have potential for long-term viability. What we recommend is knowing your market, the work that is being produced there, and focusing your efforts on finding clients who are a good fit. Research every potential client. Who have they worked with in the past? Does your style fit their brand? Do they NEED your work? What can you offer?

5. MAILER, COLD CALLS, and EMAILS OH MY
While most of the time you never know if a card gets thrown out or put on a bulletin board, you still have to make sure people know you exist. You can’t expect one mailer to generate a large volume of work, but repeated impressions on a potential client have the opportunity to pay off in the long run. We try to put our work in front of a target client 4-6 times a year. Sometimes it will be a postcard, sometimes it will be a bigger promotional kit, sometimes it may just be a phone call but our goal is consistency.

6. BUILD AN AMAZING TEAM
We hire a lot of photographers, lighting assistants, digi-techs, and producers now and they’re people we could absolutely trust in any situation to knock it out of the park. In the end you’re only as good as the people you surround yourself with, and if they are giving it their all, you will be energized to do the same.

7. PERSONAL PROJECTS
This is key. I came to Colorado with a portfolio of beaches and palm trees. I didn’t have anything that spoke to the western audience. There’s no reason to sit on your butt when you could be out shooting pictures. Our desire is to do creative projects so we just started doing them. We identified some key potential clients and industries (beer, weed, travel, lifestyle, sports, etc…) and came up with some cool concepts to execute together. This not only gave us great content for the site, but helped us create a stronger working dynamic. It doesn’t matter who presses the shutter. It’s about the concept that drives the image.

8. SHARE WORK WITH THE RIGHT PEOPLE
One of the personal projects we did was within the craft brew industry. In Denver alone there are almost 300 breweries. It’s huge. You can’t really go a block without hitting a new place. What a better place to start meeting some people? We came up with a concept of deconstructing beer recipes and instead of just doing it on our own we recruited the help of 21 of the best up-and-coming breweries to pick one beer for each that used unique ingredients like ghost pepper, kale, and pineapple. In the end, we had a fun gallery showing in one of the breweries and gave all the brewers a print and copies of a time-lapse for each shot as a thank you for their help. We met some awesome people, made some future contacts for work we’re doing now, and built up a gallery to go to bigger breweries and market conceptual work.

9. BUILD A SITE THAT SAYS “I DO THIS”
If you don’t want to shoot sports, then why put that on your site? If you want to do lit portraiture for magazines, then get your friends to pose and build a portfolio. You may be the best damn French fry photographer out there, so load it up with all the golden goodness and own it. For us, we want to be hired for our creativity, and we rock the visuals to back up those ideas whether it’s photo, video, or social. Fill your site with your own unique vision.

10. HAVE FUN, KEEP DIGGING, and SEE WHAT OTHERS DON’T
Photography should make you want to get out of bed every day. Look to your friends and colleagues for inspiration. Read blogs like this and always keep learning about your craft. It’s an amazing thing to be able to do photography as a career. In order to keep doing that you have to dig, you have to create, and you have to shoot how the hell you want and how no one else can.

In the end, only you have your vision, so find the right people to help you share it with the world.

You can see more of Chip’s work at LOCK + LAND, and can follow LOCK + LAND on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

The post It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Chip Litherland! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

You’re Just a Simple $20 Accessory Away From Much Better Portraits Using Flash

Just a quick tip today, but I think it’s an important one. Last week I was talking to a photographer and he told me had a hot-shoe flash and when I asked him how he liked it, his exact response was, “I hate it.” He hates it because he thought he would be beautiful portraits of his kids with it, but when he actually wound up with is just a brighter, harsher version of what he was getting with the pop-up flash on his camera.

First, he has to use some kind of wireless transmitter to get his flash unit off the top of his camera, and over to the side (that’s a given), but that still won’t do the trick. The sad thing is — he spend nearly $600 for his flash, but he only needed to spend $20 more to actually fall in love with it.

The secret is diffusion (putting something in front of your flash to soften the light). See below.

Above: The shot on the left has the flash off the camera in the proper position, but it’s just straight flash. Compare the one on the right; look at the difference in the quality of the light, and the softness of the shadows. This image is tremendously more flattering for your subject. All that took was holding a $20 diffuser (well, $19.90 from B&H Photo — a Westcott 1-stop diffuser) in front of the flash. That’s it. No fancy tricks. No amazing flash technique. Just a stinkin’ $20 handheld diffuser from Westcott (not a reflector — a diffuser).

That illustration above is taken from one of my most popular online classes ever. It’s called “Just One Flash” and you can watch it right here (if you’re not a KelbyOne member, you can join for a month for just $20 and watch this class right now).

I start from scratch in that class, so if you ever wanted to really, finally fall in love with your flash, you gotta check it out. It’s a short class (we shoot indoors and on location), but it will change how you feel about your flash forever (and best of all — it doesn’t matter which make or model of flash you have). I put the trailer for the class below.

Hope you found that helpful.

Have a rockin’ Tuesday everybody!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you’re going to the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando next month; stay where the instructors and KelbyOne crew are staying — our official conference host hotel, the Hyatt Recency. It’s connected to the Convention Center so you’re right there in the middle of everything and we have a special deal for PSW attendees. Details found here.

 

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TIP: How Using Keyword Sets Can Speed Your Keywording

Happy Tuesday, folks. It’s time for another awesome little Lightroom Coffee Break tidbit from Adobe’s own Ben Warde. This time he’s showing the advantages of using keyword sets to speed up the process.

Thanks, Benjamin! 🙂

Are you coming out to see my Lightroom seminar this Friday in Boston? How about on this coming Monday in Philly? Maybe Chicago or the Detroit area next month? Ticket info and stuff right here.

Have a good one!

-Scott

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Lightroom users in Philadelphia — I’m headed your way one week from today!

Hey, that rhymes. Must be a sign…a sign that if you’re a photographer in Philly, you should come out and spend the day with me next Monday for my “Lightroom On Tour” live seminar. Here’s the scoop:

Who: you (and me).
What: My full-day Lightroom seminar
Where: The Philadelphia Convention Center
When: Monday, March 13th starting at 10:00 am.
Why: Because you want to get really good at Lightroom, really fast!

It’s just $99 for the full day, including my detailed workbook, and 10 of my own custom Lightroom presets. Here’s the link for more details, and tickets.

Boston Photographers:
I’m there this Friday (in just four days!). If you haven’t already signed up, don’t be only photographer in Boston not there that day — come on out and let’s learn some Lightroom.

Hope you’ll share this with any photographers you know in either Philly or Boston. :)

Have a way better than average Monday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Next month I’m in Chicago and the Detroit area with my seminar. Hope I’ll meet you there!

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The Advantage of “Open as Smart Object in Photoshop”

Happy Monday everybody (stop snickering). OK, let’s get to it. When you take an image from Lightroom over to Photoshop (to do some things Lightroom can’t do), you can choose to send a regular “pixel-based” image over there, or you can send it over as a “Smart Object” (as shown above — where I right-clicked on the image to bring up this pop-up menu).

One of the main advantages of doing this is that you can maintain the non-destructive nature of the RAW image and re-edit the RAW file (or resize your image non-destructively) all while you’re over in Photoshop (instead of having to return to Lightroom). Here’s an example:

When you bring an image over to Photoshop as a Smart Object, it’s non-destructive because the RAW image is embedded into the Photoshop document (it’s not just a pixel-based copy of your file). You’ll know that it’s a Smart Object layer because there’s a little ‘page’ icon in the bottom right corner of the layer’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (I’m pointing my cursor at it in the capture above).

If you decide that you wanted to re-edit that RAW image right within Photoshop (maybe you thought the image was too bright, or need more contrast, or needed a white balance tweak and you wanted to apply those to the RAW image itself), just double-click on that Smart Object Layer in the Layers panel, and it opens the RAW image in the Camera Raw window (seen above).

When you’re done editing the Smart Object layer, just click ‘OK’ in the Camera Raw window and you can return to your editing (as seen here where the changes I outlined were applied to the RAW image).

That’s just a peek into why you might want to take your image over to Photoshop as a Smart Object, rather than a pixel-based image.

Hope you found that helpful.

South Philadelphia, born and raised…
OK, I just lamed borrowed a line from the Fresh Prince to deftly slide into a mention that I’ll be in Philly next Monday (a week from today) with my full day “Lightroom On Tour” seminar, and I’m hoping if you’re in the Philly area (or know a photographer who is), you’ll come and spend the day with me.

It’s just $99 for the full day including my detailed workbook and my Lightroom Presets Pack (10 of my favorite custom Lightroom presets). Here’s the link with ticket info. Also, I’ll be in Boston this Friday – if you’re not already signed up, it’s not too late.

Have a butt-kickin’, boot scootin’, bass-fishin’, tailgate liftin’, kind of Monday (I have no idea what any of that means).

Best,

-Scott

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How to Get a Custom Print Layout Into Lightroom’s Book Module

Ever since I started posting these custom print templates, I’ve been getting questions about how to take these layouts (once you’re done putting images into the layouts) , so I thought I’d do a short video about it.

NOTE: if you’re not doing Wedding albums, watch till the end of the video where I use the exact same layout for a travel photo book. These layouts can be used for any topics.

Hope that helps. 🙂

If you’re in Boston or Philly…
I’m inviting you to come out and spend the day with me as I kick off my new Lightroom On Tour full-day seminar. It’s just $99 (including a detailed workbook), and it’s 100% guaranteed — if it’s not the best Lightroom seminar you’ve ever attended, at any price, we’ll refund your ticket right on the spot! I’m in Boston on Friday, March 10th, and Philly on Monday the 13th. Come on out – we’ll have a blast! Details and tickets are here.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. My next seminar stops after that are Chicago on April 10th and then the Detroit area on April 11th . If you’re up that way, I hope you’ll come join me. 

 

 

 

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Lightroom Tutorial Clip on Designing Wedding Albums

Hi Gang – you might have heard me talk about an online course I did on “Designing Beautiful Wedding Albums in Lightroom CC and I said it was more about the design and layout ideas for the wedding album, than on teaching you how to make photo books in Lightroom (especially since I already have a course on that topic).

So, I asked our video crew to pull out an actual excerpt from the online course so you can see what I’m talking about, and once you watch it, it will be immediately clear. In this excerpt I did two layouts  (in the full online class I do a whole bunch! In fact, that’s most of the class — showing you how to create, and then save, these layouts as your own custom templates so they’re just one-click away in the future).

Anyway, the clip (below) is 5-1/2 minutes long, but you’ll learn some really solid techniques — enough that I hope it will make you want to watch the full class this weekend.

Here’s a link to the full class if you’re a KelbyOne member and you want to check it out (and if you’re not, you can join now for just $19.95 for a month and watch it (and nearly 50 other full length Lightroom classes) to death (to death I tell ya!).

But first, if you’re in Boston or Philly…
I’m inviting you to come out and spend the day with me as I kick off my new Lightroom On Tour full-day seminar. It’s just $99 (including a detailed workbook), and it’s 100% guaranteed — if it’s not the best Lightroom seminar you’ve ever attended, at any price, we’ll refund your ticket right on the spot! I’m in Boston on Friday, March 10th, and Philly on Monday the 13th. Come on out – we’ll have a blast! Details and tickets are here.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. My next seminar stops after that are Chicago on April 10th and then the Detroit area on April 11th . If you’re up that way, I hope you’ll come and spend the day with me. 

The post Lightroom Tutorial Clip on Designing Wedding Albums appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

It’s New Class Thursday!

Shooting Photos & Video with the Mavic Pro Drone with Scott Kelby and Terry White
The Mavic Pro may be small, but its packed with power. Learn how to shoot great photos and capture beautiful video with Scott Kelby and Terry White, as they take you through everything you need to know to get up and flying safely. In this class you’ll learn what you must do before you take your first flight, how to operate the drone safely, all the key settings to use for still and video capture, how to perform a pre-flight check, how to safely land, and a whole lot more. Don’t forget to download the accompanying PDF to take that pre-flight checklist with you everywhere you go.

In Case You Missed It
Get ready to fly with the DJI Phantom 3! Join Mia McCormick and John McQuiston as they show you what you need to know to get off the ground with the DJI Phantom 3. John and Mia start off by explaining the differences between the three versions of the DJI Phantom 3, before moving on to highlighting the main rules and regulations you need to understand before you take to the air. From there, you’ll get an in-depth look at the controller, a lesson on how to use the DJI Go app on your mobile device, how to prepare for and execute your first flight, helpful practice tips, and more. By the end of the class you will feel confident using the controller, the aircraft, and the app, and you’ll be ready to safely fly your DJI Phantom while capturing great photos and videos.

The post It’s New Class Thursday! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Another a Custom Print Wedding Book Layout (and free downloadable template)

OK, I’m back with another custom print layout. This one is because Lightroom’s Book Module doesn’t have a 5-photo layout. It’s does 1, 2, 3, 4, and then it jumps to multiple photo layouts starting with 6 photo layouts (for some reason, it just skipped five).

So, here’s how you get a nice 5-photo layout by using the Custom Layout feature (and yes, there’s a free downloadable preset as well).

Hope you found that helpful.

Here’s a link to the template I created just for you guys.

Best,

-Scott

The post Another a Custom Print Wedding Book Layout (and free downloadable template) appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Dave Black!

Dave Black working with Nikon SB-5000 Speedlights

Your Questions & My Answers
Hi and welcome to Scott’s blog … It is an honor to be asked to write a Guest blog for Scott … many thanks Scott for the opportunity.

I receive dozens of questions via my website’s Contact Dave page every month from passionate photographers eager to learn, and so this guest blog will be Your Questions and My Answers to a variety of my Instagram and Portfolio images.


“Alpine Shadow” … Nikon D3s, ISO1000, 1/500 at f/14, Nikon 24-70mm lens, SanDisk 32G Extreme Pro Flash Card

Q: Hi Mr. Black, Greetings from Switzerland. I really enjoy your Instagram pictures/mini photo lessons each day, and in particular the Alpine Shadow picture from Switzerland. Please can you elaborate with some backstory? Kind Regards. Francois – Zermatt, Switzerland

A: Hi Francois. So glad that you are enjoying my Instagram posts @daveblackphoto and the mini photo lessons that often accompany each IG picture.

As mentioned in the IG post, Rotenboden Station is a familiar location for those who are climbing, hiking or photographing the alpine sunrise at the Matterhorn in Switzerland.

The backstory is an exercise in patience. I had completed making my sunrise image of the Matterhorn from a location about 1 kilometer away from the Rotenboden Station and had just hiked back to the alpine railway station.

While I was waiting for the train to return and continue my journey up the mountains the sunlight and shadows on the station were beautiful and seemed to be begging for a human element to enter the scene.

The train arrived and I let it go without me. Then, after about 15 minutes, the shadow moved to reveal the cross and a minute later a fellow hiker (with backpack) approached the railway platform and his shadow was cast onto the station wall … thus offering a “different” image of the Matterhorn.

We often go out “looking” for a picture, but we must always be aware of the changing light and shadows around us… and be ready to capture a “moment” when it happens along.

Thanks for your question Francois, hope the backstory is helpful. Cheers. Dave


“Red Rythmic” … Nikon D5, ISO4000, 1/800 at f/13, Nikon 24-70mm lens at 45mm, WB 6250K, 4 NEW Nikon SB-5000 Speedlights with Radio Control, Manfrotto light stands, XQD Card

Q: Hi, Dave! I always check out your three portfolios on your website to see what’s new. Thanks for adding new pics each month. Can you explain where you placed your Speedlights for the Red Rythmic gymnastics image in your Creative Lighting Portfolio on your website? Thanks. Kevin – London.

A…Hi Kevin. Glad you are enjoying my portfolios. I really enjoy adding new images each month to the three collections!

I purposely underexposed the scene by -2.0 stops and then illuminated my subject with FLASH. I used 4 NEW Nikon SB-5000 Speedlights with Radio Control, all of which were in High Speed Sync mode.

The main SB-5000 had a Grid to help spotlight my athlete and was set to FULL power and placed high on a light stand 15 feet away.

I placed a second SB-5000 on a small rock about 20 feet out in front of the athlete and about one foot above the ground cover. This SB-5000 was set to 1/2 power and illuminated the foreground vegetation and the tail ends of the red ribbons.

Because of the uneven terrain, I had an assistant hand hold two SB-5000 Speedlights about 35 feet behind the subject. These two Speedlights, each set to FULL power illuminated some of the vegetation behind her, but not the forest background which I wanted to remain dark.

The subject was an Olympic athlete who was amazing to work with. She performed multiple leaps on the boulder despite it being a very cold, early morning shoot in the Yamanashi Forest of Northern Japan.

Thanks for a great question Kevin.  Cheers. Dave


“Winter Coyote” … Nikon D500, ISO2000, 1/1000 at f/8, Nikon 200-500mm G VR lens with Nikon TC 14E III 1.4x teleconverter, SanDisk 32G Extreme Pro SD Card.

Q: Dear Dave, I’m a longtime fan and very much looking forward to attending your classes at Photoshop World in Orlando this April. I just love the Winter Coyote picture in your Planet Portfolio. Can you tell me the how you captured this picture. Thank you. Debbie – Jacksonville, FL.

A: Hi Debbie. Gad you like the “Winter Coyote,” and please come up and say hello during Photoshop World Orlando. Your question fits into one of my favorite classes at PSW 2017: THINK Before You Press the Shutter a class teaching pre-visualization.

This image was made recently when I joined good friends Keith Ladzinski and Doug Ladzinski for a fun photo safari on a snowy January day in Rocky Mountain National Park.

We had been slowly cruising around the park photographing elk when Doug saw four coyotes way off in the distance, braving the winter storm on a small ridge about 150 yards from the road. With the snow storm and the long distance to the coyotes, I sensed this could be an opportunity for a very special picture.

Let me emphasis that, before I stepped out of the vehicle, I set the in-camera Set Picture Control menu of the D500 to standard and also reduced the contrast and saturation levels slightly. Then I increased the clarity level to help define the snow flakes and Coyote.

I kept my distance on purpose as I wanted to shoot through more volume of the falling snow. The camera-lens combination of the Nikon D500 cropped sensor and 200-500mm f/5.6 lens (at 500mm) with a 1.4x teleconverter gave me a visual lens length of about 1,050mm.

All these preparations: 1,050mm, Set Picture Control adjustments and keep my distance from the coyotes in order to shoot through as much falling snow as possible, but still see my subject clearly… were “pre-visualized” in my mind in just a few seconds. THEN I stepped out of the vehicle onto the snow.

I used manual exposure and chose to nearly overexpose the snow, but not quite. Once this single coyote moved away from the pack and ventured out onto the ridge with the falling snow and head-down posture, the “click” of the shutter was all that was left to do… Voila! “Winter Coyote.”

This process of creating the scene and technical scenario in my mind first is called “pre-visualization” and is what I believe to be the “key” missing component for many photographers trying to make the memorable pictures they want.

Hope this answer is helpful and I look forward to meeting you at PSW. -Dave


“High Riders” … Nikon D810, ISO1000, 1/2500 at f/10, Nikon 14-24mm lens, three Profoto B1 strobes in High Speed Sync mode with Profoto Tele-Zoom Reflectors and Clear Protection Plate, three C-Stands, and Articulating Boom Lift for me to shoot from, SanDisk 32G Extreme Pro Flash Card.

Q: Hi Dave, Your sports portfolio has an insane moto shot with one guy flying and another guy upside-down. Can you tell me what flash was used and how you pulled this picture off? Brandon – Louisiana.

A…Hi Brandon. Thanks for a great question, glad you like the shot.

This Freestyle Motocross image of Team FMX stars Travis Willis (white) and Ed Rossi (blue) was a commercial project that was quite an undertaking for myself and my #1 assistant, Julio Aguilar to accomplish.

I typically use my Nikon SB-5000 Speedlights with radio control for about 90% of my flash work as they are small-portable and have High Speed Sync. But occasionally I need a BIGGER blast of FLASH from a long distance to override the bright ambient sunshine and illuminate my athletes against the underexposed background or sky… so I bring in the Profoto B1 Air strobes.

As mentioned in the image caption above, I used three Profoto B1 Air strobes in High Speed Sync. Each is equipped with Profoto Tele-Zoom Reflector and Clear Glass Protection Plate (instead of the factory frosted plate).

These two modifications that I’ve incorporated with my B1 strobe system have helped make the factory 500 watt second power of a B1 illuminate my subjects more like a 1200 watt second power pack. That’s a HUGE increase in illumination simply by using the Tele-Zoom Reflector and clear protection plate on each B1 unit.

To get up where my athletes perform, I used an Articulating Boom Lift (king size Cherry Picker) to have maximum stability in the bucket, and to access my athletes at about 70 feet in the air for this particular shot.

Travis and Ed made a dozen “tandem” jumps, but this jump in particular was performed with them only a few feet apart and nearly on top of each other at the landing area… CRAZY and AMAZING skill. The icing on the cake was the full moon rising in the upper right corner in front of the lead rider’s boot.

A really awesome photo shoot and a blast to pull off … Thanks for asking.

Adios, Dave


“NFL Game Day” … Nikon D800, ISO4000, 1/1250 at f/5.6, Nikon 600mm f/4 G VR Zoom lens, WB 6250K, SanDisk 32G Extreme Pro Flash Card.

Q: Hello Dave, I am a student looking for a direction to take my life. I was very interested in photography which I really enjoyed and achieved high grades. As an enthusiastic sportsman, I was considering merging the two and becoming a sports photographer. Would you recommend this, and do you have any advice? Gavin – Houston

A: Hi Gavin. The road to being a professional SPORTS photographer who makes their entire living from their craft is not usually achieved overnight, but is an extremely rewarding occupation to pursue.

If you are currently enrolled at a university, or if you have graduated, consider assisting a local sports photographer as a way to learn the profession. Some assistants make good money assisting someone until they are ready to set out on their own business.

Just so you know, the notion that all a SPORTS photographer does is go to a game for three hours, take pictures, and collect a check is far from accurate. “Speedy” computer skills and business savvy are just as important as photographic skills if one is to “make it” in today’s sports photography market place.

The SPORTS photography industry is highly competitive, and your degree of passion should demand a great deal from you, but if you persevere and make GREAT pictures you can have a fine living.

So, do I recommend having a career as a SPORTS photographer….YES, absolutely! It’s the greatest job on the planet. And when you “make it,” you are truly on top of the world each and every time you arrive at the event.

Best to you Gavin. -Dave


“Fire Fighter” … Nikon D500, ISO200 at 30 seconds, Nikon 24-70mm lens, WB 10,000K, Manfrotto Tripod and 410 Geared Head … Lightpainting, SanDisk Extreme pro 32G Card.

Q: Hey Dave, love your light painting portraits. I read your instructional blog about the “soft focus” technique for your portraits but I don’t get it??? Can you explain it. Thanks, Jeromy – Chicago

A: Hi Jeromy. Whether you use Photoshop’s Gaussian Blur tool or my “soft focus” technique with camera and lens, the purpose is to create selected areas in the scene that are soft looking so as to draw attention more directly to the subject’s face which is in focus.

This light painting portrait of a female fire fighter makes use of a manual exposure time of 30 seconds. I used seven seconds to light paint her face, helmet, ax and torso using a small white LED penlight.

For the next 12 seconds of exposure time, I turned off my flashlight, walked to the camera, and manually unfocused the lens to infinity, then walked back to the subject to resume light painting using a small red LED penlight to “soft focus” areas of her arms and helmet.

Finally, with about 11 seconds remaining in the 30 seconds exposure and with my lens still unfocused to infinity, I light painted the backdrop with red LED flashlight while the backdrop was being “fluttered” by an assistant, thus creating a “soft focus” & motion blur… I’m always experimenting.

Hope this answer explains “soft focus.”

Adios. Dave


THANKS again to Scott for having me write this guest blog. Looking forward to seeing many of you at Photoshop World 2017 in Orlando, Florida: April 19-22. See you there! -Dave

You can see more of Dave’s work at DaveBlackPhotography.com, where he shares his monthly Workshop At The Ranch posts like this one. You can also follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

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The Joy and Wonder that is “Lights Out” Cropping

Hi gang – it’s Tuesday and time for Benjamin Warde’s “Lightroom Coffee Break” and this one is on using two features together to make cropping just so awesome (a perfect follow-up to my cropping tips post last week).

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

Have a great Tuesday everybody, and check back tomorrow for another Custom Print Layout and free downloadable template.

Best,

-Scott

 

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Photoshop World Conference 2017 Update – Q&A Style!

Hi Gang — we’re only 50-something days away from the Photoshop World Conference (April 20-22, 2017) in Orlando, Florida at the Orange County Convention Center (whoo hoo!), and I thought I’d give a quick update on what’s up, via a Q&A style post. Here we go:

Q. I know you’re in Orlando now, but you’ll be in the Vegas in the fall, right?
A. No. We are not doing a Vegas Photoshop World this year because Adobe will be holding their Adobe Max Conference in Vegas at the same time we’d be there. 

Q. I usually go to the Vegas one — but since there’s not one, should I come to the Orlando Conference instead?
A. Absolutely! It’s going to rock — Orlando is a perfect location for the conference (in fact, Photoshop World started in Orlando, back in 1999). The convention center is about 15 minutes from Walt Disney World, and amazing restaurants, clubs, shopping, and fun stuff are all within walking distance of the convention center and our host hotel. You will love it!! 

Q. Will dog photographer Kaylee Greer be there?
A. You bet! She’s all over it — doing a pre-conference workshop and class sessions.

Q. What about Matt Kloskowski? How about Jay Maisel? Serge Ramelli? Dave Black? Moose! Glyn Dewis? Julieanne Kost? Kelly Anne Conway? Terry White? Kristina Sherk? What about them?
A. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, no, yes, yes.

Q. Alright, I’ll go register right now. Joel Grimes and Lindsay Adler will be there too, right?
A. You bet. 

Q. What if I get arrested during the conference? Will you bail me out?
A. Are you planning on getting arrested?

Q. I never plan on getting arrested. Sometimes it just happens.
A. Don’t worry. Each year we put an amount aside in escrow strictly for attendee bail purposes.

Q. Really?
A. No.

Q. Last year you guys had the wonderful Gregory Heisler for your special evening presentation. Who will it be this year?
A. What an incredible night it’s going to be. It’s “An evening with Stacy Pearsall.” She’s an award-winning, medal-winning US military combat photographer and her images and stories are just stunning. Stacy absolutely mesmerized the crowd with her sessions at Photoshop World last year, and we knew giving her this after hours event would be a truly special night for everybody.

Q. Are you doing the Film Festival in Orlando?
A. Absolutely! That was another big hit from last year’s Photoshop World, and we’re making it bigger and better this year. The deadline for entries (for registered attendees only) is March 17, 2017 at midnight ET. More details (and the entry form) here. 

Q. When is the deadline to enter the Guru Awards contest?
A. Same date as the Film Festival — March 17th, 2017. Here’s the details on that.

Q. What if I’m not going? Can I still enter?
A. Ummm…..no.

Q. So these contests are only open to be people who attend?
A. That’s right.

Q. That doesn’t seem fair.
A. I dunno. It does to me. These are competitions created exclusively for people who attend the conference — so they’re competing only against other people at the conference, so we’re all there together for these competitions.

Q. Except me.
A. Right. All the cool people will be there. Except you.

Q. So, you’re kind of implying that I’m cool by saying all the cool people would be there “but” me, so you were including me in the “cool pool.”
A. I was, but I gotta tell ya, this whole line of questioning is putting you in danger of getting a one-way ticket out of coolsville, daddy-o. 

Q. OK, I get it.
A. 
That’s more of a statement, but I’ll let it slide.

Q. What is the host hotel this year?
A. 
We have an awesome hotel this year — it’s the beautiful Hyatt Grand (it’s used to be the Peabody hotel, but they renovated, expanded, and it’s even more awesome). Plus, it’s connected to the convention center so you’re right there where the action is.

Q. Is that where you and all the instructors are staying?
A. 
Yup. Well, except for Joe McNally. He insists on staying at the Four Seasons. 

Q. Really?
A. 
Of course not. Joe’s at the Hyatt, too. Room 1863. Tip: he leaves his door open when he’s taking a shower. True story.

Q. Do I have to pick my classes in advance?
A. Nope. You can go to any class you want, any time you want, and move between classes as you like. No pre-registration necessary unless you’re coming a day early for the pre-conference workshops.

Q. Are the workshops the day before still available?
A.
There are ten workshops, but a few of them are literally going to sell out this week, so if you’re thinking of coming a day early to get into one of these in-depth workshops, I’d get your ticket for the one you want now, so it’s not sold out.

Q. Will the Partner Pavilion vendor area be open to the public?
A. 
It will not be, but if you wanted to bring a spouse or someone traveling with you, and we can arrange a special free pass for them.

Q. If I’m a beginner will I be lost?
A. 
Only if you don’t follow the directional signs. You could easily wind up at Seaworld if you go too far past the end of the convention center.

Q. I meant in the sessions?
A. 
We have a lot of beginner’s that come to Photoshop World, and they’re able to follow along no problem with most of the sessions. Of course, if a session is named “Advanced” then I’d probably sit that one out, but there’s nearly 100 sessions so there will be plenty of other classes to choose from. Also, while you might arrive as a beginner, you won’t leave as one.

Q. I’m looking for a roommate for the conference. Any ideas?
A. 
Well, you could try match.com or get the Tinder app like our instructor Erik Valind.

Q. He uses the Tinder app?
A. 
I have no idea, but let’s just say that since we briefly showed his naked butt in our “Wayne’s World II” movie spoof during the opening keynote a couple of years ago, he hasn’t had to look very hard for roommates.

Q. What kind of conference is this really?
A.
Well, apparently it’s ‘clothing optional’ if that tells you anything.

Q. Are you serious?
A. 
As far as you know. 

Q. OK, this sounds like a go. When does the early bird discount expire?
A. 
You can save $100 bucks off the full conference pass if you register before March 17, 2017. 

Q. What’s the deal with you guys and March 17th? It’s like everything expires on March 17th. 
A. 
That’s when our cream cheese in our fridge at the office expires, so we felt like that was a sign. 

Q. Do I get a discount if I’m a KelbyOne member?
A. You bet! You save $100 off the full price.

Q. So, if I’m a KelbyOne member and I register before March 17th, I really get $200 off, right?
A. Right!

Q. What if I’m a Photoshop World Alumni, and a K1 member, and I register early? Do I get $250 off?
A.  No, unfortunately, offers and discounts can not be combined.

Q. Who would make a coupon that’s a foot long?
A. I know. That one always puzzled me.

Q. What if I have a question that’s not answered here?
A. 
I have answered every possible question and permutation with complete clarity, silent lucidity, and quadrophenia.

Q. OK, but let’s just pretend for a moment that somehow one slipped past the goalie. Where can I learn more?
A. 
Well, in that one-in-a-million chance, you could start by reading our official FAQ (as opposed to this somewhat nonofficial Q&A), or you can chat with our team directly from the site unless you do it late at night when they’re all busy on match.com

Q. Well Scott, this has been enlightening, engaging, and endemical.
A.
I’ll take that as a compendious. I hope I’ll see you, and your fancy words, in Orlando!

Q. I’ve always wanted to go — I wouldn’t miss it! 
A.
I knew you were one of the cool people!

Q. As cool as Erik Valind?
A.
No.    

Well, I hope you found at least 16% of that helpful.

Have a great Tuesday everybody. Wait, one more thing —  come catch me and my guest, the ambidextrous, multi-breasted, Matt Kloskowski as he “Rocks the Houseski” on “The Grid” tomorrow at 4pm – don’t miss it – http://kelbytv.com/thegrid

Best,

Scott

P.S. Q. Scott, is there any way you might embed a short video below that might just push me over the edge about going? A. I’m reluctant to do that, but OK — it’s below, but only because you asked. ;-)

 

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Five of my Favorite Photoshop Brush Tips

Happy Monday everybody, and let’s kick this week off right with a quick video with 5 of my favorite, and most-useful Photoshop brush tips (shortcuts, timesavers, etc.). Here we go:

Hope you find that helpful!

Here’s wishing you a better than average Monday!

Best,

-Scott

 

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Lightroom for Beginners: Collection Sets (what they do and why they are so helpful)

This one’s for all the folks out there that are new to Lightroom. I get a lot of questions about Collections Set — what they do and why you might ever use them, so I did a short video that I hope will show why they’re so useful for staying organized, and when to use them.

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

Photoshop People – I’ve got some brush tips for ya!
I did a quick video today on my 5 favorite brush tips over at my daily blog — scottkelby.com – hope you check it out.

Best,

-Scott

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It’s a Peter Hurley Triple Play Love-Fest!

Hi Gang – and happy Friday. Let’s kick into the weekend with a Peter Hurley love fest:


It’s “The Top Ten Tips for Connecting With Your Subject” with Peter himself as the guest on this past Wednesday’s episode of “The Grid.” We said it was 10, but Peter was like a fountain of ideas and it was just so great. Wonderful ideas, and great insights on connecting with your subject to make better portraits. Really good stuff — so worth watching. (Plus, check out Peter’s latest look).

We just recently released a brand new full-length online training class from Peter — it’s “Peter’s Top 10 Headshot Questions Answered.” People are raving about how great this class is. Check out the official trailer (below):

 

Watch the full length online class at bit.ly/2kz26ts  – if you’re not a KelbyOne member, take the 10-day free trial and you can watch this entire awesome class right now.

 

This is the one that started it all. It’s the classic, and it debuted right here on the blog, in a Guest Blog post from Peter, and now its been viewed more than 3-million times. Let’s make it 3-million and one. ;-)

There ya have it folks — a Peter Hurley Triple Play! Hope you watch Peter’s Class this weekend, and his Grid episode — just incredibly fun, helpful, insight stuff and nobody brings it like Peter.

Have a great weekend everybody and I hope to see your smiling face back here on Monday. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Heads up — If you’re thinking of entering your work in the Photoshop World Guru Awards Competition (a photography and Photoshop contest just open to folks attending the Photoshop World Conference 2017 in Orlando this April), the deadline for submissions is March 17, 2017. For more details on “The Guru Awards” click here.  

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Some Really Handy Cropping Tips

Happy Friday, everybody! Here’s one from the “best of” collection — it’s some really handy tips cropping tips, sent in by one of our readers/viewers (I love it when readers send in awesome tips — thank you!), and I wanted to share them with you here to start your Friday off right. Here we go:

croptips1

TIP #1: When you have the crop tool in place, if you need to straighten the image, just hold the Command-Key (Windows: Ctrl-key) and your cursor temporarily changes to the Ruler tool, so you can drag it out along any straight area and it will straighten your image.

croptips2

TIP #2: If you’re resizing the crop box by dragging one side of the crop boundary and maintaining the ratio – it will move the center of the crop box the direction you’re dragging… eg. the visual center changes (as seen above) – which you might want – but it you don’t… (see next image)

croptips3

…if you hold the Option key (Windows: the Alt key) while doing this, it will keep the center of the crop box in the same place…and change the periphery while maintaining the visual center point.

croptips4

TIP #3:  If you think it would be nice if they had a cross hair in the center of the crop as part of the overlay, try this: Go under the View menu, to Loupe Overlay; choose Grid, and choose “Show.” Now hold the Command key (Windows: Ctrl-key) to make the grid size control visible at the top center of the preview area then drag the Overlay Grid all the way over to the biggest size and you end up with± a cross hair in the center like you see here.

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

Have a great weekend everybody, and I hope to see you back here on Monday.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Lightroomers in Boston or Philly — I’m there next month with my full-day Lightroom seminar – come on out and spend the day with me learning Lightroom. Just $99 for the full day (included a detailed workbook), and it’s 100% money back guaranteed if you don’t absolutely super dig it (because we know you will absolutely super dig it. Guaranteed!). 🙂 

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It’s New Class Thursday!

Beginners Start Here with Scott Kelby
Imagine going out shooting with Scott Kelby at your side giving you tips, advice, and strategies for using your camera the same way he does, and that’s what this class is all about. Scott’s goal is to help beginners go beyond auto mode, be in control, and make great photographs. It’s as simple as that, and it doesn’t even matter what brand of camera you are using, as these lessons apply to all cameras. Scott shares his favorite camera settings, tips for getting tack-sharp photos, favorite lenses for different situations, and so much more. Once you start putting these concepts into practice you’re going to see an immediate improvement in your work.

In Case You Missed It
Join landscape and wildlife photographer Moose Peterson as he gets his first chance to shoot the beauty of Monument Valley. Moose talks about his preferences for camera gear and how he composes landscape shots. He shares some tips for predicting what the weather is going to do, and goes through the entire workflow for creating a time lapse video to share the experience of a changing landscape. Follow Moose as he photographs one of the most impressive landscapes in America.

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The Lightroom Training Track at the Photoshop World Conference 2017 in Orlando

Registration for the 2017 Photoshop World Conference in Orlando (April 20-22, 2017) is in full swing, but but what I wanted to highlight is the fact that we have an entire Lightroom Training Track that runs the entire three days of the conference (in short: you can come to Photoshop World and immerse yourself in nothing but Lightroom learning the whole time).

>> DOWNLOAD a PDF of the BROCHURE with full CLASS SCHEDULE RIGHT HERE <<

Of course we’ve got lots of cool new things, too; new instructors, new workshops, fun networking events, cool parties, and a whole lot more!  Plus, you’ll be learning from the best in the business in our Lightroom Track – people like Serge Ramelli, Matt Kloskowski, Terry White, and Rob Sylvan, among others.

You can register right now at PhotoshopWorld.com and save $100 by taking advantage of the Early Bird discount (to get this discount, you must register before March 17th, 2017). Also, if you’re a KelbyOne member, you can save another $100 off the full conference pricing.

I hope you can join us there this spring in Orlando. It’s going to be (wait for it…wait for it…) epic! (you knew that was coming).

Hope you have a great Thursday. 🙂

Best,

-Scott

P.S. There is NO Vegas Photoshop World this year — this is the only Photoshop World Conference for 2017, so don’t be left out — get your tickets today!

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Lightroom By The Numbers (A bunch of really handy keyboard shortcuts using numbers)

Hi Gang. First, please let me apologize for posting the totally wrong video yesterday for Ben Warde’s “Lightroom Coffee Break.”Totally my fault, and worse yet, I didn’t learn about the problem until late in the day.  Luckily, it’s fixed now, and it’s a really handy tip so here’s a link to jump back to yesterday to catch his helpful 60-second tip.

Today, I did a short video for you with a bunch of really handy keyboard shortcuts that all use numbers. They’re really easy to learn and remember, but they can save a ton of time (and I’ll bet there’s a few in there that even really seasoned Lightroom pros might not know). It’s worth checking out.

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

What I’m teaching at the Photoshop World Conference this April in Orlando
Yesterday on my blog I did a post about the classes I’m teaching at the conference, including a few classes on the Lightroom Learning Track (which runs all three days of the conference). Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec.

Hope you all have a massively great Wednesday! 🙂

-Scott

P.S. Peter Hurley is my guest on The Grid today at 4pm ET – we’re talking about portraits (of course), and our topic is “10 can’t-miss tips for connecting with your subject.” Come join us this afternoon (link) — Peter is a wonderful guest, and you might pick up some really helpful techniques. Hey, it’s always a possibility. 😉

 

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It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Robert Vanelli!

Inspiration for the Sport Grit Look
I’ve had the incredible opportunity of attending every Photoshop World (except for one) since Photoshop World started in 1999. The amount of knowledge taught in a short time is worth more than countless hours trying to learn on your own. Imagine hanging out and collaborating with instructors who have written books on the different styles you want to learn or fellow students that are top in their field. Collaboration and an image Scott took of me inspired me to create the Sport Grit look that I will teach for the first time at Photoshop World this year.

The Sport Grit Look’s Secret Ingredient
The secret ingredient to produce the sports-grit look is to light the subject with harsh light. Harsh light produces strong shadows for a powerful photo. It sculptures the subject in such a way that when applying the Lightroom preset, the grit look is achieved.

Style The Shoot To Change The Mood
I’ve been happy with the look for the past few years, but I felt it was time for a slight change. I wanted to create a different mood. I collaborated with my buddy, Photoshop World and KelbyOne instructor Mike Kubeisy. We came up with adding tape to the athlete’s fingers and wrist to symbolize injuries. Applying eye black added to the tough look.

At this point, the athlete looked like he was preparing for a game. Although it looked good, it didn’t capture the mood I was after. I wanted to show what the athlete would look like after the game. By adding dirt to his face and arms and making sure the white tape got dirty, the style was completed and the mood was set. He looked like he just walked off the field, working through his pain and injuries to capture a hard-fought victory.

Pulling emotion out of the athlete
Athletes are known for being intense when they play. To capture this emotion, have the athlete relive one of their favorite memories from a game, or create a do-or-die game winning moment. The goal is make them look intense. This short video demonstrates how I pull emotions out of an athlete during a shoot.

Finishing the look in Lightroom
To finish the look, use Lightroom to desaturate the colors, over sharpen the image, and change the color temperature along with the tint. To make life easier, you can download my Lightroom Sports Grit preset or you can learn how I created it an article I wrote Shooting Awesome Sports Portraits.

Now you have the lighting foundation and the Lightroom preset for how I create my Sport Grit Look. The final step is to practice and tweak the workflow to make it your own.

You can see more of Vanelli’s work at Vanelli.tips/VanelliAuthor, follow him on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, and see him live at Photoshop World April 20-22!

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Here’s The Classes I’m Teaching at the Photoshop World Conference in April

Hi Gang: and happy Tuesday (I know. Ugh).

If you’re planning on going to the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando this April (and I surely hope that you are — it’s open to everyone), I wanted to list the sessions I’m teaching (there are nearly 100 sessions but I hope you’ll check out a couple of mine).

Now, if you’re wondering, “Should I be attending this conference?” listen to some of the folks who’ve been there tell you in their own words (it’s short — only 30-seconds — worth a quick look to hear it from them).

I love hearing their comments and takeaways from it.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Orlando is the ONLY Photoshop World conference this year – we will not be in Las Vegas at all this year (Adobe will be holding Adobe Max conference in Las Vegas in the same time frame). 

Anyway, here’s the classes I’m teaching this year:

Essentials of Designing With Type in Photoshop
Bad type can ruin a really great photo and in this session, I’m going to show how to create everything from poster layouts, photo book covers, web graphics and more so your type complements your work, rather than destroying it. You’ll learn everything from the basics of typography including which fonts to use, when, and why, and how to create simple, beautiful-looking designs (it’s easier than you’d think). This class will change the way you think about and use type and photos together from this point on.

Creating Beautiful Photo Books in Lightroom 
In this session you’ll learn how to create beautiful photo books from right within Lightroom itself. You’ll see the entire workflow, step-by-step and exactly how to create your own custom photo books the easy way, plus I’m going to share a few tricks on creating your own custom layouts that I think you’ll really find helpful. Lots of little tips, tricks, and time-saving techniques.

Lightroom Tips & Tricks
This is an updated version of one of my most popular classes at Photoshop World, with lots of cool new tips, workarounds, shortcuts, and things to make you faster, more effective, and just have more fun using Lightroom. You’re going to learn real, practical techniques you can put to work the very next day.

The conference is open to everybody, and it’s held April 20-22nd at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida (around 15 minutes from Walt Disney World). If you haven’t planned to join us yet, it’s only 60-days away — but it’s not too late.

Here’s the link — you’ll learn more in three days than you have in three years. Break though your barriers; make new friends; take your skills up a big notch, get inspired, and have a ton of fun doing it.

See you in Orlando this April!

-Scott

P.S. You know who my guest is on The Grid tomorrow? If you guessed Peter Hurley (the man, the legend, the lover), then you were right! Wed. at 4pm ET at Kelbytv.com/thegrid

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Long Press Lightroom Keyboard Shortcuts

OK, I did not know this one. Benjamin Warde is back with another Lightroom Coffee Break, and it’s on additional functionality when you press and hold some of Lightroom’s keyboard shortcuts versus just tapping the key like usual. While I did know at least one of these (which I’ll share below the video), I sure didn’t know this one. Great stuff!

OK, the one I knew was that if you press and hold the letter “t” it temporarily hides the gray horizontal toolbar that appears below your image in the Develop Module. Pressing “t” toggles it on/off, but press and hold and it stays hidden until you release. There are probably more. There are certainly more, but I can’t think of ’em right now (hopefully you will, and post some in the comments below.

Thanks Benjamin!

Have a good one.

-Scott

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Creating The “Tilt Shift” Look in Lightroom

Mornin’ everybody — glad to see you here today. 🙂

Normally, we’d go to Photoshop and use its Blur Gallery “Tilt Shift” filter to create the “tiny town” look made famous by Tilt Shift lenses — where you photograph a scene from a high angle, (maybe on a rooftop or from a hotel window), and then applying this effect makes the scene look like a tiny toy model. Anyway, here’s a way you can do the whole thing in Lightroom.

Cool that you can do the whole thing right within Lightroom.

OK, ready for a cool Photoshop technique?
I did a step-by-step tutorial over on my daily blog on how to create a drop shadow effect that was inspired by “The Gallery at KelbyOne” winner Mark Wegner’s portfolio. When we showed Mark’s work, one of my readers asked how to create a similar shadow effect, and that’s what I did today over on the blog.

Hope you find at least one of those helpful.

Stop by back tomorrow — it’s very possible that I’ll have something unusually super cool to show you (OK, it’s more than possible). 🙂

Best,

-Scott

P.S. We’re around 60-days from the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando (we’re not doing Vegas this year – just Orlando) so come out and spend three days with us learning and laughing, and making new friends. Click right here to watch the official trailer (betcha it makes you wanna come to Orlando with us!). 

The post Creating The “Tilt Shift” Look in Lightroom appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

Slick Little Photoshop Drop Shadow Trick For Showing Prints Online

Hi Gang, and happy Monday (Ugh, I know). Anyway, this was a request from one of my readers — the drop shadow effect we’re talking about is from Mark Wegner’s website (Mark is the artist that won our “Gallery at KelbyOne” solo show). He has this slick little drop shadow behind his prints, and it’s actually very easy to do, so I did a video on it (below).

HOWEVER, I must warn youyou will learn a lot more Photoshop stuff in this video than just the drop shadow, because there’s lots of handy shortcuts and techniques wrapped inside this tutorial, so you should definitely check it out.

BONUS VIDEO! 
Below is a short add-on video that shows how to make the background transparent when you save the file, so you can place the final image on your site as just the image and shadow. Thought you might want to know that.

In other Photoshop-related news…
We’re only 60-days or so away from the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando (we’re not doing Vegas this year — Orlando only), so come out and learn and play and get faster, better and more awesome at all this stuff.  Check out the short trailer below to see what being at Photoshop World is really like.

Hope you find all (some, part, etc.) of that helpful.
Have a great day, and we’ll catch ya tamorrah. :)
-Scott

The post Slick Little Photoshop Drop Shadow Trick For Showing Prints Online appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.