A Sneak Peek at Project Nimbus, Adobe’s Future Cloud-Native Photo Editor

At the Adobe Max conference, Adobe showcases their newest features and shares a brief glimpse into some of the projects they’re working on. In a keynote address on Wednesday, Bryan O’Neill Hughes showed off one such project… a new photography app, code-named Project Nimbus.

Introducing the app, Bryan said “We’re building on the success of Lightroom, to deliver a complete cloud-native photography service that is available across desktop, web and mobile, for full resolution raw editing and sharing.”

nimbus-bryan

Adobe said their aims were for the new app to be:

  • Cloud-native – not just your files stored in the cloud, but your edits too, so they’re available wherever you are.
  • Non-destructive – edits that can always be reverted, regardless of which device you’re using, utilizing the power of the Camera Raw engine.
  • Focus on experience – putting the common tasks front and center for simplicity, yet revealing much more power when you need it.

Opening Nimbus, he went on to demo some of the features it has so far. Does the interface look familiar? They’re taking the lessons learned from Lightroom mobile and web and integrating them into a desktop app that’s easy to use, so whichever device you pick up, everything feels familiar.

nimbus-grid

Next, he showed the content-aware search facilities, searching for words such as pier, windmill and hallway. You may recognize this image analysis functionality, as it’s already available as a Technology Preview in Lightroom Web. If you’ve never managed to keyword all of your photos (nor have I!), this feature will make it quick and easy to find specific photos.

nimbus-search

He briefly showed the Edit mode, which looks very much like Lightroom’s Develop module, but with a more modern look.

nimbus-edit

He also showed how easily Nimbus integrates with the existing Lightroom mobile apps and Lightroom Web, with changes being available immediately on all of your devices, saying “Everything I do in one place is available in other places”.

Want to see it in action for yourself? The Keynote recordings are available here. The one that mentions Nimbus is called “The Future of Creativity and Design – Photography” and if you’re in a hurry, skip to about 12 minutes into the recording.

 

It’s very early days, and the app doesn’t even have a proper name yet. A public beta is expected sometime next year.

At this early stage, it looks like it’ll be perfect for photographers who want to edit their photos with pro-grade editing tools, but without the hassle of file management. We’ll wait and see how it continues to grow. I promise to bring you more details as soon as they’re made public.

One final thought… if you’re a Lightroom user with limited internet access or a dislike of cloud services, don’t worry… this is just a preview of a tool for the future. Lightroom development is carrying on as normal.

The post A Sneak Peek at Project Nimbus, Adobe’s Future Cloud-Native Photo Editor appeared first on The Lightroom Queen.

A Sneak Peek at Project Nimbus, Adobe’s Future Cloud-Native Photo Editor

At the Adobe Max conference, Adobe showcases their newest features and shares a brief glimpse into some of the projects they’re working on. In a keynote address on Wednesday, Bryan O’Neill Hughes showed off one such project… a new photography app, code-named Project Nimbus.

Introducing the app, Bryan said “We’re building on the success of Lightroom, to deliver a complete cloud-native photography service that is available across desktop, web and mobile, for full resolution raw editing and sharing.”

nimbus-bryan

Adobe said their aims were for the new app to be:

  • Cloud-native – not just your files stored in the cloud, but your edits too, so they’re available wherever you are.
  • Non-destructive – edits that can always be reverted, regardless of which device you’re using, utilizing the power of the Camera Raw engine.
  • Focus on experience – putting the common tasks front and center for simplicity, yet revealing much more power when you need it.

Opening Nimbus, he went on to demo some of the features it has so far. Does the interface look familiar? They’re taking the lessons learned from Lightroom mobile and web and integrating them into a desktop app that’s easy to use, so whichever device you pick up, everything feels familiar.

nimbus-grid

Next, he showed the content-aware search facilities, searching for words such as pier, windmill and hallway. You may recognize this image analysis functionality, as it’s already available as a Technology Preview in Lightroom Web. If you’ve never managed to keyword all of your photos (nor have I!), this feature will make it quick and easy to find specific photos.

nimbus-search

He briefly showed the Edit mode, which looks very much like Lightroom’s Develop module, but with a more modern look.

nimbus-edit

He also showed how easily Nimbus integrates with the existing Lightroom mobile apps and Lightroom Web, with changes being available immediately on all of your devices, saying “Everything I do in one place is available in other places”.

Want to see it in action for yourself? The Keynote recordings are available here. The one that mentions Nimbus is called “The Future of Creativity and Design – Photography” and if you’re in a hurry, skip to about 12 minutes into the recording.

 

It’s very early days, and the app doesn’t even have a proper name yet. A public beta is expected sometime next year.

At this early stage, it looks like it’ll be perfect for photographers who want to edit their photos with pro-grade editing tools, but without the hassle of file management. We’ll wait and see how it continues to grow. I promise to bring you more details as soon as they’re made public.

One final thought… if you’re a Lightroom user with limited internet access or a dislike of cloud services, don’t worry… this is just a preview of a tool for the future. Lightroom development is carrying on as normal.

The post A Sneak Peek at Project Nimbus, Adobe’s Future Cloud-Native Photo Editor appeared first on The Lightroom Queen.

Getting More Precise Control Over Quick Develop Settings

qd1

Hi Gang: Sorry for the late post (I had a late game to shoot last night. Didn’t get home until 1:30 am and I was too lame beat to get a post in).

This tip is how to get more precise control when editing in the Library Module’s Quick Develop panel, which instead of sliders (where you have very precise control), you have buttons (which move in pre-determined amounts when you click on them, and that’s the problem — sometimes those jumps are too big).

OK, here’s the tip:
Hold the SHIFT key before clicking the single-adjust buttons (the smaller increment) of the two. This will all make sense when you see it.

First, our original image is at the top of this post and we want to brighten it 1/2 stop in Quick Develop, which if you’ve used Quick Develop, you already know there’s no real way to do that because the the single-arrow button increases/decreases your exposure by 1/3 of a stop, and the double-arrow button increase/decrease by a full-stop  each time you click it.

qd3

Above: Here’s I clicked the single button for Exposure, and sure enough, it increased the Exposure +1/3 of a stop (+.33 if you checked it in the full Develop Module). If I click it again, it would go to +.66, right? You would have increased the exposure 2/3 of a stop. But if you want half a stop instead (a more precise change), that’s when this tip comes in.

qd4

Above: Now, before you click that single-arrow a second-time, hold the SHIFT key, and it increases the Exposure half the amount — only 1/6 of a stop. So, the first click gives you +1/3. If you hold the SHIFT key and give it a 2nd click, it only increases by 1/6 of a stop, so you now have a 1/2 stop increase (1/3 + 1/6 = 1/2 or in Lightroom terms: +0.33 plus +0.17 = +0.50).  By the way, I have just about exhausted the amount of math I do in an entire year, just in that one sentence. 😉

qd5

Above: If you were in Quick Develop and clicked the Exposure single-arrow once and then went to the Develop Module, you’d see the Exposure slider for that image had been increased to +0.33, as seen above left. If you held SHIFT and clicked it again (in Quick Develop) and then looked back in the Develop Module, you’d see that it added +0.17 to give you +0.50, as seen above right).

OK, so that’s the tip — finer adjustments in the Quick Develop module are just a SHIFT away. 🙂

I’m off to shoot the Dolphins game this weekend down in Miami (that’s three NFL games for me in one week. I’m going to need a day off. Or two). 😉

Have a good one!

-Scott

P.S. Photographers in Las Vegas — I’m there with my Shoot Like a Pro: Reloaded seminar in just a couple of weeks. Come on out and spend the day with me. 🙂

 

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Lightroom comes to Apple TV

Have you ever wanted to show friends and family your photos on your Apple TV? You could use AirPlay to stream them from your iPad, iPhone or Mac, but now, if you’re a CC user, you can also download the Lightroom app from the App Store (fourth generation Apple TV only).

To install the app, navigate to the App Store and search for Lightroom, then tap Install.

When Lightroom opens, click Sign In.

appletv-start

Lightroom asks you to open http://lightroom.adobe.com/tv in a web browser on another device, sign in with your Adobe ID and then type in the code displayed on your TV, which is much easier than trying to use the Apple TV onscreen keyboard.

appletv-login1 appletv-login2

Once you’re signed in, Lightroom downloads your collections. You can navigate around the photos using the touchpad on the remote. Swipe up to access the menu at the top, then left or right to select the Collections view, All Photos view or Settings.

appletv-collections

In the Collections view or Grid view, swipe up/down to scroll through the thumbnails. Swiping left and right allows you to navigate around the thumbnails. The highlighted thumbnail enlarges in size, and you can tap to select the photo to view it in full screen view. Any gray cells are just waiting to download.

appletv-grid

In Loupe view, swiping down/up shows/hides the Filmstrip at the top of the screen. The menu button acts as a ‘back’ button, and the Play button plays a slideshow.

appletv-filmstrip

It’s a first release, so there’s no filtering yet, which is the one feature I miss. However, with a little forethought in creating collections, the Apple TV app is a convenient option for sharing photos with friends and family.

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It’s New Class Thursday!

Finding Your Artistic Voice with Karen Hutton
It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see! Join Karen Hutton for an exploration of how to find your voice, and share it with the world. Finding your voice takes a lifetime, but you don’t need to wait to start using it. In this class Karen shares a simple process, using many visual examples, for how you can look at your own life and connect who you are to what you do with your photography. Your voice is who you are, and the world needs you to weave things that matter into what you want to say with your art. From having a vision to practical examples and exercises, Karen shares what has helped her find her voice and bring it to bear in her work. This class was filmed in front of a live audience, so be sure to stick around for the Q&A session at the end.

In Case You Missed It
Deanne Fitzmaurice began her career as a staff photographer for the San Francisco Chronicle, and her incredible images have appeared in an array of top publications ranging from National Geographic to Sports Illustrated. Deanne’s dedication, compassion, and courage to completing emotionally and photographically challenging assignments that have taken her to dangerous regions across the globe is an inspiration to all aspiring photojournalists. In this segment of our Trailblazers series Mia McCormick sits down with Deanne to discuss topics ranging from how she got started in photography to how she deals with the obstacles that arise when trying to tell compelling human interest stories, and from how she handles the emotional and physical challenges that can accompany the act of storytelling to the importance of covering the lows as well as the high moments in the arc of a story.

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Italy and Paris Photo Workshops with Serge Ramelli!

paris

Serge Ramelli has two photo workshops this spring! One in beautiful Paris and the other in wonderful Italy! They are both 6 day photography adventures, come and join him!

Journey around Paris or Italy with Serge photographing little-known locations, then join him in his retouching workshop where he will train you on Photoshop, Lightroom and everything in-between!

rome

Covering everything from shooting with your camera to the whole retouching workflow, this workshop is a great opportunity you do not want to miss. Workshop will start every day at 2pm and finish at about 11pm.

All you have to do is get your plane ticket, and bring your camera! For more info, head over to PhotoSerge.com/workshops!

The post Italy and Paris Photo Workshops with Serge Ramelli! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Troubleshooting Lightroom’s Tethering

tethbts1

Happy Wednesday, Y’all! 🙂

Yesterday we did a private, live KelbyOne members only Webcast that was a live portrait shoot (there’s a behind-the-scene shot during make-ready time), but during the 90-minute live Webcast, Lightroom’s tethering only completely quit on me about 3 or 4 times, which is a new record for their tethering reliability 😉

That’s why I thought it might be good to share how to jumpstart Lightroom’s tethering when it konks out on you (and don’t you worry — it will, multiple times during any tethered shoot). That’s it’s trademark — it’s ‘calling card’ if you will.

Three methods for troubleshooting tethering problems

tether2

#1: Restart the tethering in Lightroom
Go under the File menu, under Tethered Capture and choose “Stop Tethered Capture” (as shown here) and then go back to the same menu and choose “Start Tethered Capture” to restart it. That should do the trick, but if that doesn’t then it’s on to #2.

mark-5-topa

 

#2: Wake up your camera
This one isn’t Lightroom’s fault — it happens when your camera goes to sleep to save battery life. When it does this, the camera goes into sleep mode and Lightroom no longer sees it. To wake your camera, all you have to do is press the shutter button half-way down and that should make it spring back to life, and Lightroom’s tethering HUD will now see your camera again. Now, that doesn’t mean tethering still works (it probably won’t — you’ll take a shot and the photo simply won’t come in), so either way you’ll probably still have to go back and do method #1 again. Ugh.

tethercable

#3: Make sure your tethering cable is securely plugged-in
This one isn’t Lightroom’s fault either — while you’re shooting it’s easy to tug, drag, or simply pull out USB tethering cable that connects your camera to your computer. Even if you pull it out just a little bit, it breaks the connection, but once you plug-in back in all the way (check both the connection to the camera [#1 in the image seen above] and to the computer [#2], and then Lightroom will see your camera again in the Heads Up Display. But once again, Lightroom’s tethering probably won’t work (you’ll take a shot and photos don’t appear), so it’s back to repeating method #1. Get used to doing this — you’re going to do #1 a lot (stop snickering).

OK, there ya go! Hope you found that helpful! 🙂

Are you coming to my Free “New Stuff from Adobe” Webcast today at 2pm?
So, today is the opening keynote at Adobe’s own conference (held out in San Diego this year) called “Adobe Max” and historically they’ve introduced updates for Adobe CC products, like Photoshop, so “just in case” I’m hosting a live Webcast at 2pm “just in case” they wind up announcing any new features for products photographers love. If they don’t announce anything, I’ll still do the webcast – we can just have a cup of coffee and chat, and hang out. Sounds good? Yeah it does. 2Pm ET today at http://kelbyone.com/Webcast

After that, I’m LIVE on “The Grid” at 4pm today (our weekly talk show for photographers), and hope you can join that (the Grid is open to everyone). http://kelbytv.com/thegrid

Have a super-awesome Wednesday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you missed my “Live Photo Shoot” Webinar for KelbyOne members yesterday, and you’re a K1 Member, you can watch the rebroadcast from the member’s dashboard – click on the “Webcasts” link – you’ll find it there. Thanks to all the photographers from around the world who joined us live. Lots of great questions, interaction and community. I absolutely love it! 

The post Troubleshooting Lightroom’s Tethering appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Matt Kloskowski!

1836589_679579325421813_4483720862706522595_o

Hey there everyone! Big thanks to Scott for sharing the blog with me today, and for Brad for putting up with my constant delays in turning this in.

I’m not sure if you knew or not, but I’ve recently set out on my own. It’s the first time in my 43 years that I’ve been self-employed, and it’s been a wild ride so far. I can only imagine what the future holds. If you want to read more about it, I did a whole post over on my blog.

But today, I wanted to share with you a new series of stories I’ve been writing. It’s called “Photography Lessons for My Mom.” Basically, my mom has taken up photography over the last couple of years, and helping her along the way has been really enlightening for me.

By the way, these lessons aren’t in a specific order. I’m just writing them as they happened while I was helping my mom. Here goes:

Lesson 1 – How To Learn Your Camera

My mom had mentioned she wasn’t comfortable shooting because she didn’t know what she should have her camera set to and was getting confused by all of the settings. So we sat down and I taught her the camera, the same way I’d teach someone Photoshop. Just as I’d never teach someone just starting out in Photoshop about Curves or Calculations, I’d never tell my mom to worry about rear-curtain flash sync, or focus-peaking. Rather, I just spent that time showing her the basic things I thought she’d need to get out there and shoot.

mjk_6231-copy

But here’s the catch, and this was my advice for her. She mentioned that it’d be hard to remember all of those settings, and that every time she goes out and shoots, she forgets them and where they’re at. My advice was this…

“Mom…You bought a professional piece of camera equipment. You purposely did not buy a simple point-and-shoot, and you want something with more creative control than your iPhone. But you can’t expect to master that complicated piece of equipment by going out and shooting once or twice a month.”

As we talked, I let her know there were two ways she could get better at moving around in the menus, and knowing her camera:

  1. Get out and shoot more. There’s no substitute for practice.
  2. However… shooting more really isn’t an option for her because she’s busy. So, I offered another tip. Sit down with your camera every day for 2-3 weeks for a few minutes. Go through the menus and settings that you use a lot. I promise you, that at the end of those two weeks, you’ll feel so comfortable with your camera that you won’t think twice about changing settings the next time you go shoot.

Lesson 2 – Just Shoot!

Next lesson… So, a few weeks later when I asked my mom if she had gone out shooting she said “Well, not lately… I’m going to try to practice these settings more, and maybe in a month or so I should be ready”.

That response really hit home to me because I hear it from a lot of people. It seems a lot of people own really good photography gear, but are almost afraid to use it. They think they’re missing something, and that studying more will help.

sony-horizontal

Obviously I disagree. I don’t care where she focusses, I don’t care what ISO she has the camera set to, I don’t care if she shoots it at f/4 or f/22, or what metering mode she has, or if she’s shooting HDR brackets and all of that crap. All of that stuff is nice-to-know extras, that we all let get in the way of the most important thing – shooting. Get your camera to a good place, and shoot!

Why My Mom’s Situation Really Impacted Me?

Here’s a little back story to why this really impacted me, and I’d never even told my mom this story before that day on the phone. When I was a teenager, I played the guitar. I started when I was about 10-11 or so, and fell in love with it. I took lessons every week for years. I had 2 of the best guitar teachers in the state of NJ at the time. They’d literally spend hours with me each week. I sucked up information as fast as they’d give it out.

Like many photographers I meet, I became obsessed with the “technical” details of music. When most of my friends who picked up the guitar were just jamming away to Van Halen, Motley Crue, and Ozzy Osbourne (I was a kid in the 70s and early 80’s), I was studying music theory. I knew every scale, every chord, up down, left and right. I became an expert at the “technical” part of playing the guitar.

But one thing I never did was to create. I never created anything. I was afraid. I always thought I wasn’t ready to make music, so I just played other people’s music, and read/practiced the technical stuff (scales, chords, etc.). My friends would take their tape recorders and just play rock rhythm chords to them for 5 minutes. And then they’d play it back and just jam over it. Eventually they got really good at “creating.” I was jealous. I always felt that I “knew” more than them about music, and theory and all that techie stuff. But they were better than me.

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So why didn’t I do the same thing as them? I always thought I didn’t have the right equipment to lay one audio track on top of the other. I always thought I didn’t have the right amp, or effects pedal. I always thought I didn’t know enough about the song, or what scale to play in, or the music theory behind the song to really make anything that was my own.

Friends would ask me (much like other photographers may ask you to go shooting), to bring my guitar over and just jam out and play. I never did. Even though I knew I was good, I never felt good enough to actually go and “create” with them.

As a result, I eventually stopped playing. I lost interest because I got tired of not knowing enough to get good (or at least what I thought “good” was). I never created anything, and eventually I wasn’t interested in just playing other people’s songs so I dropped out of playing the guitar.

Lesson 3 – Stop Having GAS

I haven’t written about this one yet, so I’m debuting it here. My next lesson for my mom is to stop having GAS. I know, it’s not an easy thing for a 43 year-old son to say to his slightly-older-than-him mother. Oh, and in case you’re wondering what GAS is, it’s an acronym for Gear Acquisition Syndrome. Basically, it’s the feeling (and action) of a constant need for more gear. That some how, gear is what’s holding you back.

For a while, my mom was texting me all the time with questions of whether she needs this lens, or this filter, or this something-or-other. Where’d she get it from? Most likely her friends. She belongs to a camera club, where you have all different levels of experience and budgets. I can totally see how it happens, right? I mean, if you’re like me and you get a piece of gear the you love, what do you do? I know I go around telling people, “OMG! I love this new lens!” But I’m not necessarily thinking that they may not shoot what I shoot, or have a need for it. And so the cycle begins.

As an example, my mom came to me and asked me if she should buy a macro lens. First off, I have one and I told her she could use it anytime (for $100 that is) ;-)

macro2_1_-jpg-full

What I explained to her was that before going out and buying something new, borrow it if you can. Or make do with what you have for a little while longer. But don’t buy anything new until it becomes prohibitive not to own it. Until you get to the point where you know your photo was held back by not having that macro lens.

I also explained to her that many of the photos she was looking at were close ups, and could have been taken with her 24-240mm zoom lens with the right settings and composition. But the most important part about it, was to show her that the gear was not holding her back. In just about every situation she asks me about, I can almost guarantee you that she already has the gear she needs.

Thanks Mom!

I mentioned in the beginning that it has really been an eye opening experience for me. It’s changed the way I teach because I realize so many other people have the same questions that my mom does. So… thanks mom!

And thanks to all of you for stopping by to read my post today. If you like this article and want to follow up on the series, head on over to my website. While I post all the time, the best thing to do is just sign up for email updates, and I usually send them out every couple of weeks so you don’t have to keep checking back.

See ya!
– Matt Kloskowski

You can see more of Matt’s work at MattK.com, and follow him on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

The post It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Matt Kloskowski! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

How to Tether Your Camera to Your iPad

Happy Tuesday and welcome to November everybody (I know, I can’t believe it’s November already either).

tt

So, you guys know I’m a huge fan of TetherTools, and I use a bunch of their gear when I shoot tethered either in the studio or on location, so when I saw this blog post from them on how to shoot tethered directly into your iPad, I thought you all might be interested (and yes, I know there are a bunch of different ways to do this, but there are some distinct advantages to their solution).

Anyway, here’s a link to their post — it’s really useful, and I hope you find it helpful.

In other news…
(1) Did I mention Photoshop World Conference 2017 Orlando registration is now open? (I know I did, but it bears repeating, right?) We’re there in the Spring of 2017. You oughta come out (and get your tickets now while they’re really cheap!).

(2) Thanks to everybody who follows me on Instagram (and has been with me on my Instagram journey, or maybe took my class on how to build your audience on Instagram). I just hit 100,000 followers there last week, and I’m very grateful to everyone who follows me there, and let’s me share my travel photography images with them there daily. You guys rock!

(3) If you’re into Lightroom Mobile, I have a brand new super-awesome book on it, and it’s available right now in print or in ebook version from Amazon, or Barnes & Noble, or wherever cool Lightroom books are sold. BTW: It’s only about $20 for the print edition, and around $10 for the eBook version. Pretty sweet deals both (well, of course I would say that, but it’s true). 

OK, that’s pretty much all the news I got (though Adobe MAX is happening, so check my Facebook page for the latest stuff about any Creative Cloud updates to Photoshop, Lightroom and stuff).

Gotta run — hope your November is off to an awesome start!

Best,

-Scott

 

The post How to Tether Your Camera to Your iPad appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Posting Your Images to SmugMug Directly From Lightroom

Hi gang, and Happy Halloween!!!

I ran across this video Webinar from the folks at SmugMug on their Lightroom plug-in integration, and I know a lot of you out there use SmugMug to host your portfolio or sell your images online, so I thought I’d post it for you here.

Hope you found that helpful.

This ones for all you Photoshop users out there…
In case you missed it — I did a post over on my daily blog on three “Old School” Photoshop techniques that are still pretty useful (even if I have been using them a long, long time now). Again, stop snickering. Here’s the link. 

Hope yours is a good one today!

Best,

-Scott

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