It’s “Back-up Your Photos Friday” (and I’m giving away 5-copies of my Photoshop CC book!)

Go Back Up Your Photos. Right Now!
Seriously. If you want to do the most important thing you’ll do all day — stop what you’re doing right now and go back up your photos.This past Wednesday on The Grid our topic was backing up your photos and people were writing in with such heartbreaking stories of how they lost everything, or if they were lucky it was only thousands of photos they’ll never get back. They all mentioned how devistating it was. It takes much less time than you’d think, and you’ll sleep a whole lot better tonight knowing you’re finally, and fully backed up.

I’m embedding Wednesday episode below – we talked about which types of drives to get; how big, and different solutions for backing up to the cloud, and we answered a whole bunch of questions. If you’re not sure where to start, which this episode.

Today’s the last day to save $100 on a Photoshop World 2017 Conference Ticket
That’s right — the Early Bird Discount ends tonight at midnight for next month’s mega-conference in Orlando, Florida (it’s warm here btw), but if you get it on right now you’re not too late to save 100 bucks.

Head on over to photoshopworld.com right now and snag your tickets. You’ve always wanted to go — you keep saying “I’m going to go one of these years…” why not come join us now. You’ll learn more in three days than you have in three years, and you’ll come back faster, better, and totally re-energized. Get on it tonight – right now (well, right after you backup your photos). :)

Tomorrow night — it’s the Grand Opening of “The Gallery at KelbyOne”
We are just so excited — the gallery is complete, and tomorrow night we’ll be celebrating the photographic work of KelbyOne member Mark Wegner (Mark won our competition for a one-man show), and you’re invited to be a part of the opening, no matter where you are in the world. We’re streaming our “Artist Interview” live tomorrow night, and you’ll get a peek at the gallery, and you’ll be inspired by Mark’s work and his stories about how he “got the shots.” It’ll be a night to remember, and you’ll see it unfold live.

Details: 

Who: Me, Photographer Mark Wegner, and our host Larry Becker (Plus, a bunch of people enjoying wine and cheese). Mmmm. Cheese.
What:
The Grand Opening of “The Gallery at KelbyOne” and a solo gallery showing of photographer Mark Wegner’s work
When: Tomorrow night – Saturday, March 18th @8pm ET
Where: My Facebook Page, or at http://kelbyone.com/gallery-webcast
Why: To showcase the amazing work of KelbyOne members, and share their photography with a worldwide audience

The presentation starts at 8PM ET (Note to International viewers: the US observes Daylight Savings Time so we recently moved our clocks forward 1-hour). Hope you can join us. :)

For more details about the gallery competition (including how to enter when we open the 2nd round of entries shortly), jump over here.

 

That’s right — I’m giving away FIVE free copies of my latest Photoshop CC Book for Digital Photographers
Just leave a comment below in the comment section, and you’re entered. We’ll pick a winner this weekend and announce the winners on Monday. You can enter anywhere you are in the world — good luck everybody (if don’t win, you can buy the book online at Barnes & Noble or Amazon, in print or ebook formats)

Thanks for stopping by, and please consider this your friendly reminder that this is, officially, “Back Up Your Photos Friday.” :)

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

 

The post It’s “Back-up Your Photos Friday” (and I’m giving away 5-copies of my Photoshop CC book!) appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

It’s New Class Thursday!

Camera Focus Techniques: The Key To Super Sharp Photos with Larry Becker
Learn all about focusing with Larry Becker! You’ll hit the ground running in this class, as Larry starts off with some basic concepts and terminology before digging deeper into everything related to focus techniques, tips, and best practices. Beginners and experienced users alike can benefit from learning how to take advantage what your camera (regardless of manufacturer) has to offer to help you get super sharp photos in all kinds of situations and subject matter. You’ll learn how to set the diopter for your vision, how to control depth of field, the differences in focusing when using the viewfinder versus live view, the benefits of back button focusing, and so much more!

In Case You Missed It
Whether you are a professional or a hobbyist, there’s no getting around the fact that photography gear can be expensive. Join our Larry Becker as he shares all kinds of cool ways you can save money on a wide range of photographic accessories. Larry is always thinking of clever alternatives to conventional gear and do-it-yourself ways to make the things you need at a much lower cost. Sometimes we can save money just by learning from the cautionary tales told by our peers. In this class Larry has gathered up a ton of his favorite tips, tricks, and projects to help you find low cost solutions for things all photographers need and use. By the end of the class you’ll be ready to head out to your local hardware store and start experimenting with your own solutions and alternatives, so that you’ll have more money to spend on the important things.

The post It’s New Class Thursday! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Getting More Info From Your Grid View Thumbnails in Lightroom

I missed posting Benjamin Warde’s Lightroom Coffee Break yesterday because of that new HDR in-camera thingy, but I didn’t want skip it this week, so I just moved it until today. It’s a pretty handy one, too as Benjamin shows how to see more detail on your image’s thumbnail (plus, he shows how to customize it to show exactly what you want to see). Good stuff.

Thanks Benjamin!

2-days left to save $100
Don’t miss out on the Photoshop World Conference early bird discount — just 2-more days. Come join us in Orlando and learn some Lightroom in warm sunny Orlando. 🙂

Hope you have a great day!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Chicago and Detroit – I’m bringing my full-day Lightroom seminar there next month – hope I’ll meet you there!

The post Getting More Info From Your Grid View Thumbnails in Lightroom appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Rob Sylvan!

Photo by Levi Sim at Photoshop World 2016

10 Years of Lightroom Help Desk Advice

On Feb 19th, 2017 Lightroom celebrated it’s 10th anniversary, which also happens to be the
day I celebrated 10 years of providing Lightroom Help Desk support. Huzzah! I’ve had the honor
and pleasure of helping a lot of people in that time, and I owe that all to Scott. Being invited
back for a second guest post here is a privilege, and I figured it was the perfect opportunity
to share back some of the most important (and hopefully useful) Help Desk advice I’ve given in
that time. Here are the top 10 things every Lightroom user should know*:

*Disclaimer, these tips are intended to be helpful, but don’t just do them without
understanding all of what is involved. If you have any questions feel free to reach out to me
directly before you act, and I can help you with your specific situation.

1. Set Your Default Catalog

The most important thing every Lightroom user needs to know is where your Lightroom catalog
is located on your system. Even if you think you know, it’s worth taking a moment to make sure
(you’d be surprised how many people find it is not where they expect). With Lightroom open,
go to Lightroom > Catalog Settings > General (Win: Edit > Catalog Settings >
General), and note the name of the catalog and the path to where it is located. Is it where you
expected? If so, great! If not, here’s how you can move it to a new location:

  1. Click the Show button on the General tab of the Catalog Settings to open the folder
    containing your catalog in your file browser.
  2. Quit Lightroom. If prompted to backup, click skip for now.
  3. Copy the folder containing the Lightroom catalog (.LRCAT) and its associated preview
    caches to the location you want it to be stored (pick a locally connected internal or external
    drive).
  4. Once the copy operation is complete, double-click the catalog file to open it back
    into Lightroom. This way you can make sure all is working fine, and the new location will be
    included in the preferences.

Now, whether you moved your catalog or not, this next step is important. I highly recommend
that you manually configure this catalog to be the Default catalog (in other words, don’t use
Load most recent catalog). To do this, go to Lightroom > Preferences > General (WIN: Edit
> Preferences > General), and set the When starting up use this catalog option to the
specific catalog you just opened.

Remember, if you moved your catalog to a new location, don’t forget to go back and remove
the original folder containing your old catalog. Having a good backup in place is good idea too
(which I’ll cover in a bit).

2. Know Where Your Photos are Located

It is equally important for all Lightroom users to know how to find exactly where a given folder
or photo resides on your drive from inside Lightroom. There are a few ways to identify where
your folders and photos exist on your drive. The easiest is the good old right-click contextual
menu. Go ahead and right-click any folder in the Folders panel and choose the Show in Finder
(WIN: Show in Explorer) menu. This will open your file browser right to that folder and show
you where it exists on your drive.

Similarly, you can right-click any photo and access that same Show in menu to take you right to
that photo in your file browser. You don’t have to go that far to find that information though. If
you just hover your cursor over a folder you should see its path revealed in a tooltip popup. So
take a moment to make sure you know exactly where all of your photos are located on your
drive.

If they’re not where you want them, then let’s look at how to move them.

3. Know How to Use Lightroom to Move Photos and Folders

Now that you know where your photos are located it is in your best interest to use Lightroom to
move them if you need to put them somewhere else (with one exception that I’ll cover in tip 5).
Moving photos between folders or moving entire folders is as easy as drag and drop. By using
Lightroom to do the moving it not only moves the photos to the new location, but it also keeps
the catalog up to date with where the photos can be found. You see, Lightroom stores the
complete path to each photo in the catalog, and if anything in that path changes outside of
Lightroom you end up with a situation where Lightroom tells you that your photos are offline or
missing (here’s a link to an article I wrote on how to reconnect missing
photos
). This is easily avoided by doing the moving inside of Lightroom.

So to move a group of photos (or even just a single photo) from one folder to another try this:

  1. In the Folders panel, select the folder containing the photos you want to move.
  2. Press G to jump to Grid view.
  3. Select the photo(s) you want to move, and drag/drop them on the folder you want
    them to be moved into. The destination folder will highlight in blue to signal it is the target of
    the drop.

Lightroom will then do the moving, and update the catalog accordingly. You do need to have a
destination folder already showing in the Folders panel to complete the move, so let’s look at
how to add a folder next.

4. Keep All Photo Folders Within a Single Parent Folder

I have found it incredibly useful to always keep all my photo folders within a single parent
folder on each drive I use to store photos. The reason is that it makes my life so much simpler if
I ever need to move the entire photo library on that drive, or if I need to reconnect the catalog
to the photo library in the case of a primary drive failure/loss.

In typical Lightroom fashion there are a couple of ways to create new folders. To start, you can
go to the Library menu and choose New Folder, or click the plus sign at the top of the Folders
panel and choose Add Folder to launch the Choose or Create New Folder dialog. From here you
can either choose an existing folder you may have created in your file browser or you can
create a brand-new folder. For example, let’s say I want to add a new drive to my catalog and
want to select/create a folder on it:

  1. Connect drive.
  2. Go to Library > New Folder, to open the dialog for finding and creating a new
    folder at the location of your choosing.
  3. Create a new folder or select an existing folder. In my case, I had previously created
    a folder on this drive in Finder.

Note, my screen capture shows the dialog on a Mac, but on Windows you’d get a
Windows dialog. This is one of the few visual differences in Lightroom due to the operating
systems.

That drive and folder will now appear in my Folders panel. I can drag and drop photos or folders
into that folder from anywhere else in my catalog.

Another common scenario is the need to create sub-folders within existing folders to help with
your organizational needs. This process works in a similar fashion, but you start by selecting the
parent folder you want to create the subfolder within.

  1. Select the folder you want to create the subfolder within.
  2. Right-click to open the contextual menu and choose Create Folder Inside
    “foldername.” This opens a smaller Create Folder dialog box where you can give the subfolder a
    name and click Create to complete the process. The subfolder will then appear in the Folders
    panel. These folders are ready for me to add photos, and even new folders as my organizational
    needs demand.

Now that I have a parent folder, and a subfolder within it, I can move folders from another
drive into this drive by dragging and dropping on my new folder.

5. Know How to Move Your Photo Library to a New Drive

This is useful if you are wanting to move your entire photo Library from an internal drive to an
external drive, or if you are running out of space on one drive and want to move to a new larger
drive. Now, you could use Lightroom to move the folders as I just did in the previous tip, but I
don’t recommend doing that when your entire library is at stake. Using a move command is
risky, because if anything goes wrong in the middle of the transfer you could lose data. I prefer
a technique that involves copying the folders to the new drive outside of Lightroom, updating
Lightroom to this change, and then later manually deleting the files from the original location.
Here’s how:

  1. Open Finder (WIN: Explorer).
  2. Copy the entire folder structure (as-is without changing the structure) to the other
    drive.
  3. Open Lightroom.
  4. Once the copy operation is complete, right-click/ctrl-click the top-most-level folder
    in the Folders panel and choose Update Folder Location.
  5. In the resulting dialog box, navigate to and select that same top-most-level folder in
    the new drive (the one you just copied over there).

Lightroom will update the catalog to point to the folder in the new location (and everything
inside of that folder). If you have all your folders/photos in a single parent folder then you are
done, but if there are additional folders at the same level as that top folder you just need to
repeat steps 4 and 5 with those folders. Give it a test run to make sure everything is as it should
be before removing the originals. Again, having a good backup in place before you do this is
always a good idea.

6. Know How to Back Up Your Catalog

On the subject of backing up, there is a lot to say about backup strategies in general, but in the
context of Lightroom catalogs I simply want to address the built-in functionality Lightroom
provides. On the Catalog Settings dialog (see first tip) there is a place at the bottom where you
can configure Lightroom to create a duplicate copy of the catalog at some interval of time. This
is a set-it-and-forget-it type of feature, and its sole purpose is to create an exact duplicate of
your working catalog file in a location of your choosing (no photos are included in this backup).

I will assume you already have some sort of full system backup running that regularly backs up
all your important files, and so you may wonder if you really need this option running too.
Based on the experience of helping people with Lightroom problems over the years I feel that it
is in your best interests to take advantage of this built-in functionality. Sure, it may be
redundant, but it is free, it is easy, and it may just one day make you weep with gratitude. I set
mine to run every time I quit Lightroom, which make Lightroom throw up this prompt every
time I exit.

It is only in this prompt that I can choose where I want my backup copy to be saved by clicking
the Choose button and selecting a location. I recommend that you choose a different drive than
the drive where your working catalog is stored. In my case, my laptop has a single internal
drive, so I direct the backup to be saved to my Dropbox folder, which is automatically synced
with the cloud and my other computers. I also take this opportunity to check the boxes for
testing integrity and optimizing the catalog. Now, just because it prompts me each time doesn’t
mean I backup every time. There is a Skip button that I use when I’m in a hurry and just want to
quit.

I try to create a backup at least once a week or after I’ve done a whole lot of work. Each time
this function runs it saves a copy of your catalog to the folder you chose. Lightroom does not
overwrite existing backup copies. As a result you end up with a folder of iterative copies of your
catalog. This can be very handy for recovering from self-inflicted problems or from the rare case
of catalog file corruption.

7. Know How to Restore From Your Backup

Since a backup copy of the catalog is an exact duplicate of your working catalog at the time the
backup was created all you must do to restore from the backup is the following:

  1. Close Lightroom (if open).
  2. Open the Lightroom folder containing your working catalog file in Finder/Windows
    Explorer.
  3. Move the “bad” catalog file out of that folder to another location for
    safekeeping.
  4. Move the latest/greatest “good” backup catalog copy into the Lightroom folder to
    replace the bad one. Starting with Lightroom 6/CC 2015 the backup copy is also compressed
    into a zip file to reduce file size (and keep people from accidentally opening a backup copy), so
    you may need to unzip the backup before you can move it into the Lightroom folder.
  5. Once placed in the Lightroom folder, double-click the catalog file to open it into
    Lightroom and take it for a test drive.

The backup copy of the catalog has the same name as your working catalog, so you should be
good to go. It will only contain all the work up until the moment you made that backup copy, so
backup frequently. If restoring from the backup solved your problem, don’t forget to delete the
“bad” catalog that you moved out earlier.

8. Mange those Backup Copies

The only downside to running the catalog backup function (aside from the time it takes to run)
is that Lightroom will keep putting new copies of the catalog into that folder until the drive is
full. The management of the backup folder falls on us. Since we only value the most recent
version(s) of the backup copies I periodically go into that folder and delete all but the most
recent 2 or 3. Note that Lightroom doesn’t backup the preview caches because those can
automatically be regenerated if lost. I’ve seen people regain hundreds of gigabytes of free
space after clearing out old backup copies.

9. Know How to Rename Your Catalog

I often hear from people who are using the most up to date version of Lightroom, but have a
catalog file named with an older version of Lightroom and it may also have some other
numbers in it, such as Lightroom 5 Catalog-2. They wonder if this is a problem, and they want to
know how to rename the catalog. First, it is not a problem at all. You can call your catalog file
anything you want to call it. Lightroom doesn’t care. However, if you want to rename it to
something that makes more sense to you, here’s how:

  1. With Lightroom closed, go to the folder where the catalog resides using your
    operating system’s file browser; Finder on Mac, and Windows Explorer on WIN.
  2. Using your file browser you can rename the catalog file, but keep the file extension
    the same (.LRCAT). Then rename the Preview cache and Smart Preview cache (if applicable) the
    same way, but retain the word Previews and Smart Previews in the name along with the
    original file extension.

So, for example if your catalog and preview cache was named:

Lightroom 5 Catalog-2.lrcat
Lightroom 5 Catalog-2 Previews.lrdata

And you wanted to change it to “Lightroom Catalog,” you would end up with:

Lightroom Catalog.lrcat
Lightroom Catalog Previews.lrdata

Once renamed, double-click the catalog file to open it into Lightroom. Now you can give it a
quick test drive to make sure all is well, and this writes the new catalog name into the
Lightroom preference file. Be sure to update your Default catalog setting to point to this
renamed catalog (see Tip 1).

10. Create a Custom Camera Raw Default

OK, all those tips were focused on library management, so let’s end on a Develop tip that could
speed up your workflow. Lightroom has a set of default processing settings that are applied to
all raw photos after import. Did you know that you can customize those settings to start your
raw photos down the processing pipeline using your preferred choices? I’m not talking about a
preset selected on the Import screen, but rather the built-in default settings. Save your import
presets for something creative, and customize the baseline settings.

Let’s go through the steps to customize the default settings to include two of the most common
adjustments people ask me about, lens corrections and camera profiles, but feel free to add any
other settings you want to customize your process (or not include these if you’d rather not).

  1. Select a raw photo that has not been processed at all beyond the default settings
    and press D to jump to Develop. Click the Reset button for good measure to ensure it has no
    other settings applied because every adjustment (even set to 0) is included in the default
    settings.
  2. Expand the Lens Corrections panel, click the Profile tab if not active already, and
    check Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections.

Note: Including profile corrections can be resource intensive, so exclude this from your
defaults if performance is degraded.

  1. Expand the Camera Calibration Panel, click the Profile drop-down menu and choose
    the camera profile you prefer to be the starting point.

Note: The list of camera profiles varies with the camera model used to create the selected
photo.

  1. Go to Develop > Set Default Settings to open the Set Default Develop Settings
    dialog box. Default settings are specific to each camera model, in this case a Nikon D610, so if
    you are using multiple camera models you will need to update the defaults for each model
    separately.

Tip: You can also hold the Option (WIN: Alt) key and watch the Reset button change to Set
Default and click that button to open the Set Default Develop Settings dialog box.

  1. Click Update to Current Settings to customize the default settings to include the
    changes you made.

Note: While it states the changes are not undoable, this just means that you can’t revert
back to the Adobe defaults via the Edit > Undo menu. You can always open this dialog box
and click Restore Adobe Default Settings if you want to go back to the original settings.

This will only affect raw photos from that specific camera model as they are imported in the
future, and if you hit the Reset button on a previously imported raw photo from that specific
camera model. You must repeat that process to set defaults for any other camera models you
are using. This does not change the settings on any previously imported photos.

I hope you’ve found some of those tips helpful. Please feel free to reach out to me with any
questions you may have, or come see me at Photoshop World, where I’ll be teaching, and
answering questions at the Expert Bar.

You can see more from Rob at photofocus.com and follow him on Twitter and Facebook. Aside from also being a KelbyOne Help Desk Specialist, and Adjunct Professor at NHTI, he is a founding member of Stocksy United (a stock photography co-op). Rob writes the “Under the Loupe” column for Lightroom User Magazine, and is the author of many photography related books. His latest book is Taming Your Photo Library with Lightroom.

The post It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Rob Sylvan! appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Lightroom Mobile’s Awesome New In-Camera HDR

I love what Adobe has been doing with Lightroom Mobile, and the direction it’s been going, and their latest edition (in an update released late last week for iPhones and Android phones that can capture RAW images) adds an HDR shooting mode to their already robust in-app camera (you access the HDR feature from the pop-up menu in the app, as seen above). BTW: Professional mode allows you to control Aperture, ISO, and shutter speed among others.

Anyway, I did a field test shooting with HDR at Disney Springs, (a shopping and recreation area that’s part of Walt Disney World) and I’ll share my thoughts in the captions below.

1: Taken in “Automatic” (normal, non-HDR) mode. (note the super blown out windows). It looks pretty much like what you’d get with the iPhone’s regular built-in camera.

2: Here’s the new HDR version (un-edited). Now you can see detail out the windows. It takes three separate images (the normal exposure; one under-exposed and one that over-exposed) and merges them into a single image with the data from all three, and it uses the same technology that Lightroom on the desktop uses. The blue color here out the windows is a bit funky, but overall it’s a big improvement, and it doesn’t look too “HDR-y.”

3: Here’s the same HDR shot but I tweaked it in Lightroom Mobile, mostly by adding contrast, a little bit of clarity, and a -11 edge vignette. The blues in all these shots looks a bit “off” to me somehow (they look too cyan), but of course that’s something I could have probably fixed when I was editing the image in Lightroom Mobile.

Here’s another example:

1: Taken in “Automatic” (normal, non-HDR) mode. Notice the outside is pretty blown out (look out the door, and the windows directly above it, and the window panes up near the roof. Totally blown out).

2: Here’s the HDR version of the same shot. Now you can see what’s outside the door (it’s no longer blown out), and compare the window panes near the roof with the previous shot. It captured all that detail. All that being said — the image looks kinda flat and kinda HDR-y, which may or may not be a good thing, depending on how you feel about that look.

3: Here’s that same HDR photo with contrast added, a little bit of clarity, a slight edge vignette (-11), and a slightly warmer white balance. I think it makes the HDR image look less “HDR-ie.”

One last one:

1: Taken in “Automatic” (normal, non-HDR) mode. Blown out, outside.

2: Here’s the HDR version of the same shot. Now you can see what’s outside the door (it’s no longer blown out).

3: Here’s the HDR shot tweaked in Lightroom Mobile, in the same way, but making the white balance warmer. The look outside in the HDR version, and this one, aren’t awesome, but still an improvement over the straight non-HDR shot.

An added benefit: Lower noise (big time!)
Because of the wider dynamic range of these combined HDR images, if you have to open up any shadow areas, the noise is dramatically lower than it would be using the regular camera without the HDR, and that’s a big win. In fact, the difference is pretty startling (like it is on the Desktop version of Lightroom as well).

One downside…
Lightroom Mobile is doing quite a bit of processing and de-ghosting in the background to make this all happen, so it takes a while for the image to appear in Lightroom (it’s processing in the background). I imagine over time, it’ll get faster (in later updates of LR Mobile), but for now, there’s a very noticeable lag (seconds) between when you take the HDR image and when you can actually see it.

Hope you found that helpful (and thanks for being patient while I was out launching my new Lightroom seminar tour).

Have a great Tuesday, and we’ll catch you tomorrow (when we’ll be back with Benjamin Warde’s “Lightroom Coffee Break”).

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Only 4-days left to save $100 on a Photoshop World 2017 Conference Pass using the early bird sign-up special. The conference is next month in Orlando, Florida (April 20-22, 1017). Tickets and more details here. 

 

The post Lightroom Mobile’s Awesome New In-Camera HDR appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

Portrait Retouching Tip of the Day

The tip is simple. Don’t do what you see above. Don’t go too far.

When people submit images for blind critiques on “The Grid” and we say “That’s some bad retouching…” it’s not that they don’t know the Photoshop techniques, or don’t understand how to retouch a photo — it’s that they always take it too far. Their eyes are “too white” – the skin is like plastic (see above) with no visible pores – everything is just simply too much.

If you want to have better, more realistic-looking retouches, you don’t need to learn some fancy new technique. You just need to do “less” of the ones you already know. If you’re fairly new to retouching, and you think you’ve got it looking about right, go and back off everything by about 35% and you should be “there.”

Hope you find that helpful. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Only 4-days left to save $100 on a Photoshop World 2017 Conference Pass using the early bird sign-up special. The conference is next month in Orlando, Florida (April 20-22, 1017). Tickets and more details here. 

The post Portrait Retouching Tip of the Day appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

How do I change or create keyboard shortcuts?

If you’re using the English version of Lightroom with another language keyboard, some of the keyboard shortcuts might not work.

Mac only

On a Mac, the easiest way to change a keyboard shortcut is to use the operating system keyboard preferences.

  1. In Lightroom, make a note of the menu command, being careful to note any punctuation too.
  2. Go to Applications > System Preferences.
  3. Open the Keyboard preferences and select the Shortcuts tab.
  4. Select App Shortcuts and click the + button.
  5. Select Lightroom in the Application pop-up. If it doesn’t show up, scroll down to the bottom, select Other and navigate to Applications > Adobe Lightroom > Adobe Lightroom.app.
  6. In the Menu Title field, type the menu command, for example, Build Standard-Sized Previews. You must type the command exactly as it appears in the menu, including ellipses (such as Synchronize Folder…) and any other punctuation. To type an ellipsis, use three periods without spaces.
    If you run into problems, you can enter the full menu path with a hyphen and right arrow to divide each menu, for example, Library->Previews->Build Standard-Sized Previews.
  7. Click the Keyboard Shortcut field and tap your keyboard shortcut, holding down Cmd, Opt and/or Shift as needed.
  8. Click Add.
  9. Repeat steps 4-8 for any additional shortcuts.
  10. Quit and restart Lightroom.

Windows or Mac

If you’re on Windows, there isn’t a user interface for changing shortcuts, but it’s possible to edit Lightroom’s TranslatedStrings file. This file is designed for language localizations, but can be edited to change various user interface elements including keyboard shortcuts. This isn’t officially supported by Adobe, but works reliably. If you run into problems, you can simply delete the file (or restore a backup), so it’s relatively risk-free.

  1. Quit Lightroom.
  2. Navigate to:
    • Windows—C: \ Program Files \ Adobe \ Adobe Lightroom\ Resources \ en \
    • Mac—Macintosh HD / Applications / Adobe Lightroom / Adobe Lightroom.app. Right-click on the app and select Show Package Contents, then navigate to / Contents / Resources / en.lproj /
  3. Create a plain text file in that folder and name it TranslatedStrings_Lr_en_US.txt. Use a plain text editor such as Notepad on Windows or TextWrangler on Mac (free on the Mac App Store), rather than a word processor like Word. (This was previously called TranslatedStrings.txt in Lightroom CC 2015.7/6.7 and earlier.)
  4. In another text editor window, open the TranslatedStrings file for another language, for example, TranslatedStrings_Lr_es_ES.txt from the es or es.lproj folder.
  5. The file is long and includes translations as well as shortcuts, so you’ll probably need to use your text editor’s search function to find the shortcut that you need to change.
  6. Copy your chosen line into the TranslatedStrings_Lr_en_US.txt and edit the shortcut after the = sign. For example, to change the Decrease Rating shortcut from a to ; you’d find the line that says “$$$/LibraryMenus/MenuShortcut/DecreaseRating=a” and change it to “$$$/LibraryMenus/MenuShortcut/DecreaseRating=;”.
  7. Save the file, and keep a copy somewhere else too, as it may be replaced when you update Lightroom.
  8. Restart Lightroom. If it doesn’t seem to work, check for curly quotes (“ ”) and replace them with straight quotes (” “), and ensure there are no blank lines at the end of the file.

If you’re using Lightroom in another language, the principle is exactly the same, but the TranslatedStrings file will already be in your language’s project folder (e.g. the ‘fr’ or ‘fr.lproj’ for French), and you’ll need to edit it, rather than creating a new file. If you’re editing an existing file, obviously back it up first!

The post How do I change or create keyboard shortcuts? appeared first on The Lightroom Queen.

Only 5-Days Left to Save $100 on Photoshop World 2017 Tickets

Pack your bags – we’re going to Orlando (but you might as well save $100 by getting your tickets before this Friday, when the early-bird discount expires).

But before you do anything, watch this video (below), and then we’ll talk after (it’s 30-seconds – you’ll dig it).

OK, thanks for stayin’ with me. OK, here’s the deal:

It’s regularly $799 for a full conference pass BUT if you register by this Friday (the 17h), it’s only…

$699…BUT….

If you’re a KelbyOne member, you save another $100, so it’s only…

$599. Legit.

OK, call your friends – get a group together – pack your bags, and I’ll see you in Orlando, April 20-22, 2017. It’s going to be (wait for it…wait for it…) legendary (bet you thought I was going to say epic).

Have a great Monday everybody. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. You can still get special discount room rates at the Hyatt. our official host hotel for the conference (it’s right next to the convention center). 

 

The post Only 5-Days Left to Save $100 on Photoshop World 2017 Tickets appeared first on Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider.

Beginner’s Tip: How to Import to an External Hard Drive

Mornin’ everybody, and greetings from a chilly Philadelphia (where it’s 23° and raining. Brrrrr!). I’m here for the 2nd stop on my nationwide “Lightroom On Tour” full-day seminar. Sorry I missed blogging on Friday — I was in a less cold (but snowy) Boston for the first stop on my Lightroom and had my hands full prepping to launch the new tour.

BTW: Thanks to the 360+ photographers who came out to spend the day with me there — such a fun, gracious, totally “into it” crowd to present to (here’s a shot below from Friday).

One question that came up more than once on Friday was “How do I import directly to an external hard drive, in Lightroom’s Import Window?” so I thought I’d tackle that here this morning.

STEP ONE: In the Import window, up in the right hand corner by default it’s going to choose the location on your computer where you normally store your photos, as seen here where you can see it wants to import the photos to my computer’s Hard Drive. But, did you notice that when you move your cursor over that area (like I did here), it highlights in light gray? It does that to let you know this is a clickable link.

STEP TWO: Click anywhere in that highlighted area and a pop-up menu appear (seen here) and to choose an external hard drive, click on “Other Destination…” as shown. This brings up a regular “Open” window where you can navigate not only to your external drive, but to any particular folder on that drive.

STEP THREE: Choose your external drive (and folder) where you now what your images to be imported into, and you’re all set (as seen here, where the “TO” destination for my images is how my External Hard Drive.

Hope you found that helpful.

THIS FRIDAY IS…
…the deadline to save $100 using the “Early Bird Discount” on the Photoshop World Conference 2017 coming up at the end of next month in Orlando — make sure you sign up now (hey, a-hundred bucks is a a-ahundred bucks, right!). Right here for details and tickets. 

Looking forward to meeting a whole bunch of photographers here in Philly today. Maybe I’ll get a cheesesteak from Steve’s for lunch!! Mmmmmm. Cheesesteak! 🙂

Have a good one!

-Scott

P.S. My next Lightroom Seminars stops are Chicago and the Detroit next month. 

The post Beginner’s Tip: How to Import to an External Hard Drive appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

Lightroom Performance – General System Maintenance

Lightroom can’t perform well if the operating system is struggling. While not specific to Lightroom, it’s worth running regular computer maintenance and optimizing other software running on your computer. This includes operating system and driver updates, keeping hard drives in good condition, and minimizing the number of other programs running in the background.

 

OS updates

updatecomputer2Updates to the Windows or Mac OS X operating systems not only fix bugs and add security fixes, but also improve its performance and compatibility with applications. Windows service packs and other updates are available from the Microsoft Windows Update website and Mac OS X updates are downloaded from the App Store.

 

Driver updates

Windows Update includes some drivers, however these are rarely the latest, so you’ll need to visit the component manufacturer’s website, or for laptops, the laptop manufacturer’s website to get the latest drivers. It’s important to keep drivers up to date, especially for the graphics card and input devices such as Wacom tablets and other mice, as older drivers can cause crashes as well as performance issues.

Most Mac OS X driver updates are downloaded from the App Store, but you’ll need to check manufacturer’s websites for third-party hardware drivers such as Wacom tablets.

 

Care of Hard Drives

In the previous post, we said that it’s important to keep enough space available on your hard drives, especially for the boot drive and the drive containing your catalog. Both the operating system and Lightroom need room to work.

You can clear space on your hard drive by emptying the Recycle Bin/Trash, deleting files (be careful!) or moving them to another drive. You can also clear out temporary files and caches to help to free up additional space. Both operating systems include tools to make this easier: Windows 7, 8.1Windows 10 and Mac.

If you’re working with spinning drives on Windows (not SSD’s), you also need to defragment/optimize the hard drive from time to time. This moves the data back into contiguous blocks, making it faster to read/write. Microsoft provide instructions for Windows 7, 8.1 & 10.

The Mac operating system automatically defragments small files, so it’s not necessary unless you’re working with large numbers of huge files (e.g. 1GB videos).

 

Other system tasks and software

Other programs running in the background also reduce the resources available to Lightroom. To make these resources available to Lightroom, quit other open applications, including those running in the system tray (Windows) / menubar (Mac), and prevent unnecessary programs running on startup. To stop apps opening on startup, try these instructions for Windows and Mac.

Anti-virus/security software running real-time scans also use your computer’s resources, so it may be useful to pause the scan while you’re working in Lightroom, and exclude specific files such as the catalog and previews.

The same goes for other software that runs automated tasks in the background, such as backup software or cloud sync such as Dropbox. If you’re struggling with performance issues, temporarily pausing these tasks can help.

 

Reboot occasionally

Finally, it’s worth rebooting from time to time… yes, even on a Mac!

 

Next week, some of Lightroom’s settings and preferences can be optimized for speed…

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